Skip to main content

I won't, I might, I am": undergraduate women and stages of change for participation in leadership development activities

Resource type
Thesis type
(Thesis) Ed.D.
Date created
2007
Authors/Contributors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore the applicability of the Transtheoretical (Stages of Change) Model to examine undergraduate women’s intention to participate in leadership activities and to identify variables related to their differential participation. Use of the Stages of Change framework extends the examination of student leadership to those not yet involved in leadership activities and recognizes individual intentions for becoming involved, as opposed to only considering actions. Identifying variables associated with intention to take action in the near future may provide insight for programmatic activities to encourage and support involvement in leadership activities. This study incorporated two individual specific variables and one context variable, reported to influence women’s choice of involvement: leadership self-efficacy, gender role orientation and perception of institutional climate. Demographic variables and previous experiences were also considered as potential contributors to Stages of Change. A total of 684 female undergraduate students at a single public post-secondary institution in British Columbia completed a survey which included: Stages of Change algorithm, General Leadership Self-Efficacy Scale, BEM Sex Role Inventory-Short Form, Perception of Chilly Climate Scale and a demographic and experiences form. Findings indicated that 73% of the respondents were in pre-action stages (pre-contemplation, contemplation and preparation) with 53.8% of those individuals intending to become involved in the near future. A positive correlation (r =.175, p
Document
Copyright statement
Copyright is held by the author.
Permissions
The author has not granted permission for the file to be printed nor for the text to be copied and pasted. If you would like a printable copy of this thesis, please contact summit-permissions@sfu.ca.
Scholarly level
Language
English
Member of collection
Download file Size
etd3283.pdf 6.79 MB

Views & downloads - as of June 2023

Views: 0
Downloads: 0