Security, race and risk in the post 9/11 era: an examination of the experiences of racialized populations at the Canadian border

Resource type
Thesis type
(Thesis) M.A.
Date created
2009
Authors/Contributors
Abstract
Since 9/11, concerns have been raised about the heightened use of racial profiling by law enforcement agencies. Travellers, in particular, have experienced the full scale of the new heightened security measures whenever they cross the Canadian border. The treatment of racialized individuals and groups by border agents has been justified as necessary but the experiences of racialized travellers highlights how balancing security concerns with respect for human rights is challenging. This thesis examines the experiences of racialized individuals crossing the Canadian border post-9/11. Through interviews with 14 racialized Canadians, I argue that their experiences of border-crossings and their views of racism in Canada are consistent with the perception that there is an increased focus on racialized groups as potential risks because of their racial background.
Document
Copyright statement
Copyright is held by the author.
Scholarly level
Language
English
Member of collection
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ETD4806.pdf 995.21 KB