The Cedar Project: Surviving the Streets Without Shelter, Trauma and HIV vulnerability among Aboriginal young people who use drugs in two Canadian cities

Resource type
Thesis type
(Project) M.P.H.
Date created
2009
Authors/Contributors
Abstract
Aboriginal scholars suggest that the legacy of colonialism is a key contributing factor to rising rates of homelessness among Aboriginal young people. This analysis examined factors related to sleeping on the streets for 3 nights or more and HIV vulnerability among Aboriginal young people who use drugs. A profile of these young people was created using data from the Cedar Project. Young people who reported sleeping on the streets for 3 nights or more were significantly more likely to reside in Vancouver, report HIV or HCV positive antibody status, have a diagnosed mental illness, and report being sexually abused or sexually exploited. Aboriginal females were more likely than males to report HIV or HCV positive antibody status, previous sexual abuse and previous sexual exploitation. Having a stable place to sleep is critically important to enhancing health promotion efforts and resiliency for Aboriginal young people who use drugs.
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Copyright is held by the author.
Scholarly level
Language
English
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ETD4686.pdf 449.44 KB