Information and allegations of Catholicism in Elizabethan and Jacobean England

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Keywords: 
Great Britain --Politics and Government --1558-1603
Great Britain --Politics and Government --1603-1625
Catholics --England --History --16th Century
Catholics --England --History --17th Century
England --Church History --16th Century
England --Church History --17th Century
Information
Communication
Legitimation
Denunciation
Religion
Reformation
Abstract: 

This thesis examines several aspects of the enforcement of conformity to the religious and political regimes of Elizabeth I and James I against Catholic political and religious opposition. I discuss the means by which royal and ecclesiastical officials obtained information about suspects through the use of churchwardens, spies, private informers, priest hunters, searchers, neighbours and Catholics themselves; why this information was forthcoming; and the reactions of Catholics and others who found themselves under scrutiny. I argue that those persons whose behaviour might be described as opportunistic, or even malicious, legitimized their actions by adopting the anti-Catholic rhetoric and concerns current in England at this time. Whether used as a tactic of empowerment against enemies, or a route to influence and reward, these acts signalled an acceptance of the argument that Catholicism was subordinate and a threat.

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
Copyright remains with the author. The author has not granted permission for the file to be printed nor for the text to be copied and pasted. If you would like a printable copy of this thesis, please contact summit-permissions@sfu.ca.
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)
Statistics: