Flavonoids and neuroprotection: biochemical and population-based analyses of potential neuroprotective factors related to dementia.

Date created: 
2008
Keywords: 
Alzheimer's disease -- Pathophysiology
Alzheimer's disease -- Nutritional Aspects
Diet in Disease
Diseases Risk Factors
World Health
Flavonoids
Dementia
Flavonoids
Negative correlation
Oxidative stress
Neuroprotection
Nutritional factors
Abstract: 

Dementia is a leading contributor to burden of disease in Canada and the world. With an aging population, there are projected increases in its global prevalence. Evidence suggests that some neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, that lead to dementia are partly preventable, and that dietary intake of flavonoids may have relevant neuroprotective effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate such potential for flavonoids using biochemical- and population-based analyses. Among 23 developed nations, negative correlations were found between rates of dementia and intake of all flavonoid groups, especially flavonols (p <0.05); these correlations were not significantly confounded by other relevant factors. The biochemical component helped elucidate possible mechanisms of flavonoid protection against heme-amyloidβ;-enhanced oxidative reactions with potential relevance to neurotoxicity. Overall, the evidence suggests that flavonoids, especially flavonols, and flavonoid-rich foods are part of a preventive dietary strategy, along with other health-promoting factors, towards decreasing rates of dementia.

Description: 
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Language: 
English
Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
Copyright remains with the author
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
A
Department: 
School of Kinesiology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
(Kinesiology) Thesis (M.Sc.)
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