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Cultural commodification: where ethnic minorities and development policies meet

Resource type
Thesis type
(Project) M.A.
Date created
2008
Authors/Contributors
Abstract
Broad development policies targeting impoverished ethnic minorities seek to merge cultural preservation and economic development goals using cultural commodification as a means to improve livelihoods and way of life. Since culture found its way into development policy—transforming it from a commodity centred concept to a human centred one—the diversity of culture itself has risen to the forefront as something in need of protection and as a valuable commodity. While the global tourism industry offers economic potential, a plethora of constrtaints are evolving. New opportunities are caught in the balance between the satisfying of economic and cultural objectives, especially for ethnic minorities who experience some form of marginalization. In an effort to empower them advocacy organizations, development practitioners, and some national policies encourage community participation in the decision-making process. This requires cooperation and will from all actors involved or affected from the community level right up to central government.
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Scholarly level
Language
English
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etd4069.pdf 2.1 MB

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