Planning in the contact zone: Indigenous cultural heritage management in the Salish Sea

Resource type
Thesis type
(Project) M.R.M. (Planning)
Date created
2022-09-28
Authors/Contributors
Abstract
Indigenous cultural heritage (ICH) around the world is being lost at a rapid rate, due to factors such as increasing development, private property rights, and colonial planning schemes. This research focuses on the island of Xwe'etay/ Lasqueti in the Salish Sea of British Columbia as a case study for better understanding the intersection of planning, property, and ICH management. Through 20 semi-structured interviews with local planners and knowledge holders, a 34-question survey to gain insight into local residents' perceptions of ICH, community-based participatory research, and in-depth literature review, I identify the barriers and potential pathways for planners to improve ICH management. This research finds that current top-down regulations and policies that guide heritage management practices are failing to effectively protect remaining ICH and instill a sense of uncertainty and fear among settler residents. The primary barriers to improved ICH conservation that local planners are facing include limited decision-making power, community resistance to regulation, path dependency, resource and capacity limitations, and a gap in knowledge. The findings reveal that engaging First Nation and settler community members in ICH conservation, active relationship-building, and knowledge mobilization may relieve some of these barriers.
Document
Extent
94 pages.
Identifier
etd22180
Copyright statement
Copyright is held by the author(s).
Permissions
This thesis may be printed or downloaded for non-commercial research and scholarly purposes.
Supervisor or Senior Supervisor
Thesis advisor: Markey, Sean
Language
English
Attachment Size
etd22180.pdf 1.11 MB