A user perspective on the avalanche danger scale – Insights from North America

Resource type
Thesis type
(Project) M.R.M. (Planning)
Date created
2021-12-20
Authors/Contributors
Author: Morgan, Abby
Abstract
Danger ratings are used across many fields to convey the severity of a hazard. In avalanche risk management, danger ratings play a prominent role in public bulletins where they concisely describe existing and expected conditions. While there is considerable research examining the accuracy and consistency of avalanche danger ratings, how backcountry recreationists interpret and apply the scale has so far not received much attention. Using the responses from 3195 participants to an online survey, this research provides insight into how recreationists perceive and use the North American Public Avalanche Danger Scale during trip planning. In addition, the study examines how background variables such as levels of engagement in an activity and avalanche safety training relate to the observed patterns. The results from this research offer evidence-based reflections on how the effectiveness of the danger scale could be improved for the recreationists who rely on it the most.
Document
Extent
92 pages.
Identifier
etd21756
Copyright statement
Copyright is held by the author(s).
Permissions
This thesis may be printed or downloaded for non-commercial research and scholarly purposes.
Supervisor or Senior Supervisor
Thesis advisor: Haegeli, Pascal
Language
English
Attachment Size
etd21756.pdf 11.2 MB