Cultural Differences in Infant Spontaneous Behaviour: Evidence From a Small-Scale, Rural Island Society

Resource type
Date created
2020-09-28
Authors/Contributors
Author: Aime, Hilary
Abstract
We examined infant activity level and attention in 45 eight‐month‐old infants (mean age 8.8, SD = 2.07) living in two diverse socio‐cultural contexts: rural island societies in the South Pacific and urban Western societies in North America. Infants and mothers were observed for 10 minutes in a face‐to‐face interaction and later coded for the frequency of infants' motor movements and gaze shifts. Results indicate that infants in urban North American societies produced more frequent motor movements and gaze shifts compared to infants in rural, island societies in Oceania. We interpret these discrepancies as reflecting differences in social experience, ecological niches as well as physiological experiences. These findings highlight the complex interplay of development and experience early in life.
Description
The full text of this paper will be available in September, 2021 due to the embargo policies of Infant and Child Development. Contact summit@sfu.ca to enquire if the full text of the accepted manuscript can be made available to you.
Identifier
DOI: 10.1002/icd.2204
Published as
Aime, H., Rochat, P., & Broesch, T. (2020). Cultural differences in infant spontaneous behaviour: Evidence from a small-scale, rural island society. Infant and Child Development, n/a(n/a), e2204. https://doi.org/10.1002/icd.2204.
Publication details
Publication title
Infant and Child Development
Document title
Cultural Differences in Infant Spontaneous Behaviour: Evidence From a Small-Scale, Rural Island Society
Publisher
Wiley Online Library
Date
2020
Publisher DOI
Copyright statement
Copyright is held by the author(s).
Scholarly level
Peer reviewed?
Yes
Language
Member of collection