Shaping Vancouver Series 2018: Contested Places | Change in Living Communities: False Creek South

Resource type
Date created
2018-10-11
Abstract
False Creek South is a 55-hectare stretch of waterfront land between the Burrard and Cambie bridges, characterized by extensive green spaces and a diverse mix of housing types. The design of this community has its roots in the values-based social planning that was revolutionary when it was introduced in the 1970s and 80s. By giving priority to values associated with quality of life and a livable city, this area was created with an equal portion of non-market rental housing, co-ops, and condominiums in a “Garden City” setting geared to a pedestrian culture.The lease agreements, with strata leasehold owners, co-ops and non-market housing operators that made this diverse mix of housing possible, will begin to expire in 2025. As we near this date, the City, which owns approximately 80% of False Creek South, has begun to explore the future of this neighbourhood and its residents. The issues are many and include the leases, the diversity of people that is supported by the housing mix so central to this community, retention and redevelopment of existing urban fabric, development along the edges of the community, such as the lot directly adjacent to Olympic Village Skytrain Station, but also how this example of a values based planned community can integrate with the ever-evolving urban fabric of the City.
Description
Recording of a panel discussion from a Shaping Vancouver event (2018)
Published as
Shaping Vancouver Series 2018: Contested Places | Change in Living Communities: False Creek South | October 11, 2018
Copyright statement
Copyright is held by the author(s).
Scholarly level
Peer reviewed?
No
Language