The ‘Greening’ of Christian Monasticism and the Future of Monastic Landscapes in North America

Resource type
Date created
2019-07-16
Authors/Contributors
Author: Brown, Jason
Abstract
Christian monasticism has an ancient land-based foundation. The desert fathers and later reform movements appealed to the land for sustenance, spiritual metaphor, and as a marker of authentic monastic identity. Contemporary Roman Catholic monastics with this history in mind, have actively engaged environmental discourse in ways that draw from their respective monastic lineages, a process sociologist Stephen Ellingson calls ‘bridging’. Though this study is of limited scope, this bridging between monastic lineages and environmental discourse could cautiously be identified with the broader phenomenon of the ‘greening’ of Christianity. Looking to the future, while the footprint of North American monastic communities is quite small, and their numbers are slowly declining, a variety of conservation-minded management schemes implemented since the 1990s by some communities suggests that the impact will remain for many decades to come.
Document
Published as
Brown, J.M. The ‘Greening’ of Christian Monasticism and the Future of Monastic Landscapes in North America. Religions 2019, 10, 432. DOI: 10.3390/rel10070432
Publication title
Religions 2019
Document title
The ‘Greening’ of Christian Monasticism and the Future of Monastic Landscapes in North America
Date
2019
Volume
10
Issue
432
Publisher DOI
10.3390/rel10070432
Copyright statement
Copyright is held by the author(s).
Scholarly level
Peer reviewed?
Yes
Language
Member of collection
Attachment Size
religions-10-00432.pdf 214.72 KB