Exploring the Long-Term Impact of a Foot Patrol Policing Initiative in North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Resource type
Thesis type
(Thesis) M.A.
Date created
2016-04-21
Authors/Contributors
Abstract
Foot patrol, one of the oldest methods of policing, is utilized by law enforcement agencies in North America and internationally. Existing research has recognized the positive impact of foot patrol policing on satisfaction among police and citizens, fear of crime, and citizen perceptions and attitudes. However, the effect of foot patrol on crime and disorder, particularly its long-term impact, remains less certain. As such, the current study examines a foot patrol policing initiative established in Lower Lonsdale, North Vancouver, British Columbia using police incident data from 01 January 2007 to 31 December 2012 to determine whether foot patrol policing has been successful in reducing crime over time. Findings indicated that while the foot patrols had an overall impact in reducing certain classifications of crime, there was variation in its effect from year to year. Study limitations, as well as directions for future research, will also be discussed.
Document
Identifier
etd9585
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Copyright is held by the author.
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This thesis may be printed or downloaded for non-commercial research and scholarly purposes.
Scholarly level
Supervisor or Senior Supervisor
Thesis advisor: Andresen, Martin
Member of collection
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etd9585_NMelenka.pdf 2.99 MB