What’s in a Friendship? Partner Visibility Supports Cognitive Collaboration between Friends

Resource type
Date created
2015
Authors/Contributors
Abstract
Not all cognitive collaborations are equally effective. We tested whether friendship and communication influenced collaborative efficiency by randomly assigning participants to complete a cognitive task with a friend or non-friend, while visible to their partner or separated by a partition. Collaborative efficiency was indexed by comparing each pair’s performance to an optimal individual performance model of the same two people. The outcome was a strong interaction between friendship and partner visibility. Friends collaborated more efficiently than non-friends when visible to one another, but a partition that prevented pair members from seeing one another reduced the collaborative efficiency of friends and non-friends to a similar lower level. Secondary measures suggested that verbal communication differences, but not psychophysiological arousal, contributed to these effects. Analysis of covariance indicated that females contributed more than males to overall levels of collaboration, but that the interaction of friendship and visibility was independent of that effect. These findings highlight the critical role of partner visibility in the collaborative success of friends.
Document
Published as
Brennan AA, Enns JT (2015) What’s in a Friendship? Partner Visibility Supports Cognitive Collaboration between Friends. PLoS ONE 10(11): e0143469. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0143469
Publication title
PLoS ONE
Document title
What’s in a Friendship? Partner Visibility Supports Cognitive Collaboration between Friends
Date
2015
Volume
10
Issue
11
Publisher DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0143469
Copyright statement
Copyright is held by the author(s).
Scholarly level
Peer reviewed?
Yes
Language
Member of collection
Attachment Size
journal.pone_.0143469.pdf 1.79 MB