Perceptions of Interpersonal Versus Intergroup Violence: The Case of Sexual Assault

Resource type
Date created
2014-11-24
Authors/Contributors
Abstract
The social identity approach makes a distinction between behavior motivated by intergroup versus interpersonal identities, which may be relevant to victim blaming in the case of rape. Using a mock jury paradigm, we examined the impact of defining rape as an act of interpersonal violence (personal assault) versus intergroup violence (a “hate crime”), crossed with a manipulation describing the attacker as either an acquaintance or stranger. Defining rape in intergroup terms led to less victim blame than when it was defined in interpersonal terms, and participants blamed the victim more when she was assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger.
Document
Published as
Droogendyk L, Wright SC (2014) Perceptions of Interpersonal Versus Intergroup Violence: The Case of Sexual Assault. PLoS ONE 9(11): e112365. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0112365
Publication title
PLoS ONE
Document title
Perceptions of Interpersonal Versus Intergroup Violence: The Case of Sexual Assault
Date
2014
Volume
9
Issue
11
Publisher DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0112365
Copyright statement
Copyright is held by the author(s).
Scholarly level
Peer reviewed?
Yes
Language
Member of collection
Attachment Size
11.pdf 3.76 MB