Time-Delayed Subsidies: Interspecies Population Effects in Salmon

Resource type
Date created
2014-06-09
Authors/Contributors
Abstract
Cross-boundary nutrient inputs can enhance and sustain populations of organisms in nutrient-poor recipient ecosystems. For example, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) can deliver large amounts of marine-derived nutrients to freshwater ecosystems through their eggs, excretion, or carcasses. This has led to the question of whether nutrients from one generation of salmon can benefit juvenile salmon from subsequent generations. In a study of 12 streams on the central coast of British Columbia, we found that the abundance of juvenile coho salmon was most closely correlated with the abundance of adult pink salmon from previous years. There was a secondary role for adult chum salmon and watershed size, followed by other physical characteristics of streams. Most of the coho sampled emerged in the spring, and had little to no direct contact with spawning salmon nutrients at the time of sampling in the summer and fall. A combination of techniques suggest that subsidies from spawning salmon can have a strong, positive, time-delayed influence on the productivity of salmon-bearing streams through indirect effects from previous spawning events. This is the first study on the impacts of nutrients from naturally-occurring spawning salmon on juvenile population abundance of other salmon species.
Document
Published as
Nelson MC, Reynolds JD (2014) Time-Delayed Subsidies: Interspecies Population Effects in Salmon. PLoS ONE 9(6): e98951. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0098951
Publication title
PLoS ONE
Document title
Time-Delayed Subsidies: Interspecies Population Effects in Salmon
Date
2014
Volume
9
Issue
6
Publisher DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0098951
Copyright statement
Copyright is held by the author(s).
Scholarly level
Peer reviewed?
Yes
Language
Member of collection
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4.pdf 353.44 KB