The empress in late antiquity and the Roman origins of the imperial feminine

Date created: 
2011-01-07
Identifier: 
etd6521
Keywords: 
Byzantium
Empress
Emperor
Gender
Feminine
Masculine
Imperial
Numismatics
Statuary
Monument
Art
Literature
Rhetoric.
Abstract: 

This thesis looks at the position of the empress in Late Antique Byzantium, and seeks to trace the processes by which imperial women came to wield power, and actively participate in governance. In this context, Julio-Claudian and early imperial constructions of the imperial feminine help highlight the continuities and changes that shaped the political role of empresses. By using gender as an analytical tool this thesis explores the dynamic nature of the relationship between empress and emperor, and assists in the diachronic analysis of the various ways in which imperial power was articulated in literary and visual representations.

Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
Copyright remains with the author. The author granted permission for the file to be printed, but not for the text to be copied and pasted.
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Dimitri Krallis
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of History
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.
Statistics: