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Great Power Politics in Post-Cold War Period: The Ukraine Crisis of 2014

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-09-30
Abstract: 

The Ukraine Crisis of 2014 which led to the annexation of Crimea by Russia has been one of the worst European issues since the end of the Cold War. NATO’s relations with Russia have worsened ever since Russian troops invaded and annexed the Crimean peninsula in 2014. This paper examines why Russia intervened and eventually annexed Crimea during the Ukraine crisis through theoretical approaches in IR (international relations). In addition, the paper also discusses the consequences of Russia’s actions in Crimea during the Ukraine Crisis of 2014. This paper argues that Russia intervened and annexed Crimea during the Ukraine Crisis of 2014 because of NATO’s expansion policy in eastern Europe. The study was conducted using a qualitative and a non-positivist approach to research (interpretivist) which is centered on the humanistic view of the social sciences. On the one hand, the findings of this study support my central thesis; it revealed that NATO’s expansion policy in eastern Europe was the cause of Russia’s actions in Crimea during the Ukraine Crisis of 2014. On the other hand, the findings of this study revealed that there are alternative factors that also motivated Russia to intervene and annex Crimea from Ukraine such as nationalism, identity, and Russia’s quest for great power status. Further, Russia’s invasion and eventual annexation of Crimea without the consent of Ukrainian authorities had several consequences. For instance, it caused tension between Russia and NATO, increased military spending, and led to numerous international sanctions.

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Article
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Stability Under International Anarchy

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-08-01
Abstract: 

This paper is a clear and concise comparison of the realist, liberal, and constructivist perspectives in international relations (IR). The paper compares the approaches and perspectives of scholars from these three schools of thought to anarchy and the conditions that can increase the possibility of stability to emerge under international anarchy. This paper shows that scholars from the realist, liberal, and constructivist schools of thought in IR offer different approaches and perspectives to anarchy and the conditions that can increase the likelihood of stability to emerge under international anarchy. Also, the paper shows that even within the same school of thought, there are contrasting positions on the conditions that can increase the likelihood of stability to emerge under anarchy.

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Article
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Policy Assemblages and Policy Resilience: Lessons for Non-Design from Evolutionary Governance Theory

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-06-25
Abstract: 

Evolutionary governance theory (EGT) provides a basis for holistically analyzing the shifting contexts and dynamics of policymaking in settings with functional differentiation and complex subsystems. Policy assemblages, as mixes of policy tools and goals, are an appropriate unit of analysis for EGT because they embody the theory’s emphasis on co-evolving elements within policy systems. In rational practice, policymakers design policies within assemblages by establishing objectives, collecting information, comparing options, strategizing implementation, and selecting instruments. However, as EGT implies, this logical progression does not always materialize so tidily—some policies emerge from carefully considered blueprints while others evolve from muddled processes, laissez faire happenstance, or happy accident. Products of the latter often include loosely steered, unmoored, and ‘non-designed’ path dependencies that confound linear logic and are understudied in the policy literature. There exists the need for a more intricate analytical vocabulary to describe this underexplored ‘chaotic’ end of the policy design spectrum, as conjuring images of ‘muddles’ or ‘messes’ has exhausted its usefulness. This article introduces a novel metaphor for non-design—the bird nest—to bring studies of policy design and non-design into lexical harmony.

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Article
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The Secession of Crimea From Ukraine: An International Law Perspective

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-06-01
Abstract: 

The secession of the Crimean peninsula from Ukraine in 2014 was one of the most talked-about issues  by  the  media,  politicians,  and  decision-makers.  The  secession  worsened  relations between the West and Russia thereby, threatening international peace and security. This paper looks at the secession of Crimea from Ukraine from an international law perspective. The goal of the paper is to examine whether Crimea’s secession from Ukraine was legal or illegal under international law. This paper argues that the secession of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014 and its  subsequent  incorporation  into  Russia  is  illegal  under  international  law  because  Russia intervened in Crimea. On the one hand, the findings of this paper support my central thesis/ argument. On the other hand, the findings of this study revealed that proponents of Crimea’s secession  from  Ukraine  like  Russia  argue  thatthe  secession  of  Crimea  is  legal  under international law because of international laws on self –determination and because Crimea’s secession from Ukraine is similar to Kosovo’s secession from Serbia

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Article
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Housing Policy in the UK: The Transformation of the "Right To Buy" Social Housing Policy

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-06-01
Abstract: 

This paper examines how and why the Right to Buy (RTB) scheme changed drastically in the UK from 1980 to 2016 through the lens of Hall’s model of social learning and Sabatier’s advocacy coalition framework (ACF). This paper argues that changes were made to the Right to Buy scheme from 1980 to 2016 in order to increase the attractiveness of the policy. The study was conducted using a non-positivist approach to research. The findings of this study revealed that that the UK government’s decision to reduce the residency requirement from 3 years to 2 years in the RTB scheme in 1984 and to increase the percentage of discounts in the scheme constitutes a first-order policy change as described by Hall. On the other hand, the introduction of the new Right to Acquire in the RTB policy by the Labor party in 1997 constitutes a second-order change. While abolishing the RTB policy in Scotland by the Scottish National Party in July 2016 constitutes a third-order change. Furthermore, the results of this paper showed that the shared core beliefs in the virtues of private ownership between the Conservative party and the “New Labour” that came to power in 1997 in the UK can better be understood through the lens of Sabatier’s ACF.

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Article
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Comparing Ambiguities: Municipalities, Francophone Minority Communities, and Immigration in Canada

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-09-23
Abstract: 

This article analyses the implication of municipal governments and civil society actors in immigration through multilevel and collaborative governance arrangements. It argues that studying the roles of ambiguities is critical to understanding the activism of political entities with ill-defined status and mandates, such as municipalities and Francophone minority communities. This research adds to the literature on the “local turn” in highlighting that ambiguities are both a condition —i.e., a driver that makes collaborative and multilevel arrangements work—and an outcome of collaboration practices, characterized by ambiguities regarding the balance of power, the aims of collaboration in a competitive sector, and by conflicting forms of accountabilities. The article identifies three approaches that actors use to deal with these ambiguities in a context where resources are not equitably distributed and where the role of the federal government is critical. In this configuration, municipalities and FMCs develop adaptive, rather than transformative, approaches to ambiguities.

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Article
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Tweeting Power: The Communication of Leadership Roles on Prime Ministers’ Twitter

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-03-05
Abstract: 

This article examines the communication of leadership roles by prime ministers Justin Trudeau and Theresa May on Twitter. I argue that tweets from prime ministers implicitly communicate information about how prime ministers lead and what their job entails: what I call role performance and function. I develop an inductive typology of these leadership dimensions and apply this framework to Trudeau and May’s tweets in 2018 and 2019. I find first that Trudeau is a much more active Twitter user than Theresa May was as prime minister, attesting to different leadership styles. Second, both use Twitter primarily for publicity and to support and associate with individuals and groups. Trudeau is much more likely to use Twitter to portray himself as a non-political figure, while May is more likely to emphasize the role of policy ‘decider.’ Both prime ministers are framed much more often as national legislative leaders rather than party leaders or executives. Finally, May’s tweets reflect her position as an international leader much more than Trudeau’s. Assessing how prime ministers’ tweets reflect these dimensions contributes to our understanding of evolving leader–follower dynamics in the age of social media. While Twitter has been cited as conducive to populist leaders and rhetoric, this study shows how two non-populist leaders have adopted this medium, particularly in Trudeau’s case, to construct a personalized leader–follower relationship.

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Article
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Governing Sex Work: An Agonistic Policy Community and its Relational Dynamics

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-07-08
Abstract: 

Few policy scholars have analyzed prostitution laws and the governance of sex work.  This is unfortunate because the policy area is associated with societal problems, and the systematic study of public policy was initially conceptualized to address such problems.  Moreover, this dearth is problematic for reasons related to how we conceptualize policy processes, actors involved in them, relationships among them, power structures characterizing them, and ultimately the significance of the policy. Prostitution laws in Canada, in terms of recent policy changes through constitutional challenges to criminal provisions and through practices of implementation in local governance, suggest the analytical usefulness of the policy community heuristic in capturing important relational dynamics.  With a focus on relationships and not merely on structural and strategic linkages, it can capture many nuances in why dynamics change and what the implications of this change are for policy.  Conceptually, this study suggests that agonistic relations emerge within policy communities that may be deeply divided when members experience or perceive catalyst events, cannot easily refute the evidence concerning factors contributing to these events, and converge on a clearly defined response to address problems associated with these events.

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Article
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A Question of Respect: A Qualitative Text Analysis of the Canadian Parliamentary Committee Hearings on The Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-12
Abstract: 

We evaluate the Canadian parliamentary hearings on The Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act to determine whether respectful and fair deliberation occurred.  Our focus is on the content, tone, and nature of each question posed by committee members in hearings in both chambers.  We find that, on the whole, the vast majority of questions met this baseline, but that committee members were biased toward witnesses in agreement with their position and against witnesses in opposition to it.  In addition to our substantive findings, we contribute methodological insights, including a coding scheme, for this kind of qualitative text analysis.

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Article
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Research Openness in Canadian Political Science: Toward an Inclusive and Differentiated Discussion

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03
Abstract: 

In this paper, we initiate a discussion within the Canadian political science community about research openness and its implications for our discipline.  This discussion is important because the Tri-Agency has recently released guidelines on data management and because a number of political science journals, from several subfields, have signed the Journal Editors’ Transparency Statement requiring data access and research transparency (DA-RT).  As norms regarding research openness develop, an increasing number and range of journals and funding agencies may begin to implement DA-RT-type requirements.  If Canadian political scientists wish to continue to participate in the global political science community, we must take careful note of and be proactive participants in the ongoing developments concerning research openness.

Document type: 
Article
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