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Open Access Journals Support in Canada

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010-06-22
Abstract: 

Describes preliminary results of the pan-Canadian Open Access Journals Support in Canada survey of university libraries and presses conducted in spring 2010. The majority of respondents are involved in scholarly journal publishing, with more planning to get involved. There is strong trend towards preferential support for open access publishing. Responses to questions about support for a variety of open access models indicated that any model for OA transition would received some level of support from a majority of libraries.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

The role of the research library in an emerging global public sphere

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010-07-18
Abstract: 

Presents a vision of a potential future global public sphere, why it is needed and signs of emergence, and the role of the research library in this global public sphere, as provider of a distributed knowledge commons, preserver of scholarly information, and source of specialized expertise. Key short-term transitional steps are covered, particularly transition to a fully open access scholarly publishing system.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Open Content Alliance (OCA) vs. Google Books: OCA as superior network and better fit for an emerging global public sphere

Author: 
Date created: 
2010-01-11
Abstract: 

The Open Content Alliance (OCA) is a network of libraries
and similar organizations committed to digitizing and providing
broadest possible access to books and other materials; over 1.6
million books are already online under OCA principles. OCA is
analyzed in contrast with Google Books (as per the preliminary Google
Books Settlement, November 2009), using Castell’s network theory and
theories of an emerging global public sphere, based on the work of
Habermas and Fraser. OCA is seen as a superior network to Google
Books, with particular strengths in connectedness, consistency (shared
goals), flexibility, scalability, survivability, networking
(inclusion / exclusion) power, and network-making power, including the
ability to form strategic alliances. The lawsuit against Google
Books, and the settlement, illustrate some of the limitations of
Google Books as a network, for example the lawsuit per se is a
challenge to Google Books’ rights to make decisions on inclusion and
exclusion, and illustrates poor connectedness and consistency, two
attributes Castells points to as essential to the performance of a
network. The respectful, law-abiding approach of OCA is a good fit
for a global public sphere, while the Google Books Settlement takes a
key issue that has traditionally been decided by governments (orphan
books), and brings the decision-making power into private contract
negotiations, diminishing democracy. The current Google Books
Settlement is fractured on a national (geographic) basis; consequences
could include decreased understanding of the rest of the world by a
leading nation, the U.S. This works against the development of a
global public sphere, and has potential negative economic and security
implications for the U.S.. OCA is presented as one node of an
emerging library network for the global public sphere, a global public
good increasing access to knowledge everywhere, increasing the
potential for informed public debate towards global consensus.

Document type: 
Preprint
File(s): 

SCOAP3: a key library leadership opportunity in the transition to open access

Author: 
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

The SCOAP3 consortium aims to transition the whole of High Energy
Physics (HEP) publishing from a subscription to an open access basis.
SCOAP3 currently has commitments for more than 63% of the projected
10 million Euros per year budget, from partners in more than 21
countries,
including more than 50 libraries and consortia in the U.S. Full
participation from the U.S., a leader in HEP research, is both
essential and particularly challenging, as the U.S. does not have a
national coordinating body that can make one commitment for the
country, as many other countries do. While the work to undertake this
commitment for the library should not be underestimated - figuring
out subscription costs when journals are part of a big deal, often
through a consortium - neither should the benefits be underestimated.
In brief, the benefits are the optimum access that comes with open
access - full open access to the publisher's PDF for everyone,
everywhere; a model for transitioning to open access that involves no
financial risk, as commitments are capped at current subscriptions
expenditures, and SCOAP3 is addressing the issue of unbundling
successful journals from big deals and reducing costs accordingly;
future financial benefits as a transparent, production-based pricing
model for scholarly communication introduces competition into a
market where it has been lacking; gaining publisher acceptance of
library advocacy efforts for open access by addressing a key concern
of publishers (financing the journals in an open access environment)
and perhaps most importantly, establishing a leadership role for
libraries in a future for scholarly communication that will be
largely open access.

As Douglas (2009) explains, "To move forward in achieving open
access, U.S. libraries that subscribe to any of the five journals
that are considered 100 percent convertible to SCOAP3 (European
Physical Journal C, Journal of High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics
B, Physical
Review D, and Physics Letters B) need to participate". If this
describes your library, please go to the SCOAP3 website, now, to
learn more and participate in this innovative global collaboration
that can be a model, not only for transitioning to open access, but
also for how humankind can
work cooperatively across borders to accomplish a great good that
will benefit all of us.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Open Access: Key Trends

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009-09-22
Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Toward the UNBC research library: e-learning, e-research, scholarly communication

Author: 
Date created: 
2009-11-24
Abstract: 

Research libraries are complex organizations whose mandate and focus are in transition, although in many ways their core values are the same. This presentation addresses the issues of e-learning, e-research and scholarly communication in this context.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

"We Own It": Dealing with Perpetual Access in Big Deals

Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Presents the results of a survey of Canadian university libraries that investigated whether libraries have been able to stay abreast of the many changes that affect their access to paid-for e-content. This report emphasizes the publishers' obligations to notify licensees when ownership changes hands and libraries' need to actively pursue licensed content in ownership transfers. The meaning and application of 'perpetual access' clauses in e-journal licenses under change-of-ownership situations is also discussed.

Document type: 
Article

The SFU Library: presentation to the Board of Governors November 26, 2009

Date created: 
2009-12-08
Abstract: 

The 21st century academic library can be thought of as having four distinct lobes: the information commons, the learning commons, the digital research commons, and the academic town square, each of which has a physical and an electronic representation. SFU Library is no different, and has achieved success in each of those areas.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Multicultural Canada

Author: 
Date created: 
2008-08-07
Abstract: 

With funding from Canadian Heritage, the seven partners in the Multicultural Canada Project have been able to digitize significant works associated with our multicultural immigrant communities and present them through a single integrated portal on the World Wide Web. The current project will result in the digitization of materials associated with the Chinese, South Asian, Vietnamese, Doukhobor, German, Ukrainian, German and Hungarian communities. Some materials such as the Chinese Times newspaper, provide significant coverage of their communities. Newspapers, photos, letters, and books are included in the online collection. In many cases English and French abstracts and even fulltext are available and searching may be done in English, French and the vernacular. The project also includes learning materials, making the material further accessible to their communities, all Canadians, and the world.

Led by the Simon Fraser University Library, the project includes library and cultural partners in Canada. The importance of such a project was highlighted at a conference presented in spring 2006 in Vancouver, where community members, libraries, archives and scholars came together to discuss different aspects of the record of multicultural community experience.

It is to be hoped that further contributions to the Multicultural Canada portal will continue, and plans are afoot to submit a followup proposal to focus on newspapers.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Synergies, OJS, and the Ontario Scholars Portal

Date created: 
2008-06-27
Abstract: 

This paper introduces the CFI-funded project Synergies: The Canadian Information Network for Research in the Social Sciences and Humanities, and two of its regional components. This four-year project is a national distributed platform with a wide range of tools to support the creation, distribution, access and archiving of digital objects such as journal articles. It will enable the distribution and use of social sciences and humanities research, as well as to create a resource and platform for pure and applied research. In short, Synergies will be a research tool and a dissemination tool that will greatly enhance the potential and impact of Social Sciences and Humanities scholarship. The Synergies infrastructure is built on two publishing platforms: ?rudit and the Public Knowledge Project (PKP). This paper will present the PKP project within the broader context of scholarly communications. Synergies is also built on regional nodes, with both overlapping and unique services. The Ontario region will be presented as a case study, with particular emphasis on project integration with Scholars Portal, a digital library

Document type: 
Book chapter
Conference presentation