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Open Access: Policy, Academic, and University Perspectives

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006-06-16
Abstract: 

The landscape of scholarly communications is transforming into an Open Access environment. Policies are being set by national funding agencies and universities, among others. This session will present an overview of major policy issues, the academic (teaching faculty) perspective on open access publishing and self-archiving and what it all means in the real-world university (library) environment.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Open Access for Librarians in Developing Countries

Author: 
File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

The basics of open access are presented, as a starting point for discussion by librarians in developing countries. Open access is defined; resources for searching are presented, and resources for creating open access archives and publications. Policy development needed for open access is explained, along with what librarians in developing countries can do to promote open access.

Document type: 
Other

Open Peer Review & Collaboration

Author: 
File(s): 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

This brief presentation summarizes my present view on the transformative potential of a fully open access approach in the area of peer review. While a great deal of research has been done on peer review per se, as Peggy Dominy and Jay Bhatt discuss in the same series, progress in science depends not just on incremental progress, but also on periodically reexamining our most basic assumptions. It is timely to do this with peer review - a long-standing tradition which may have evolved from the time of the Inquisition, as Peggy and Jay point out - not an optimal approach for Galileo, and perhaps not an optimal approach in our day and age, either.

Open sharing of information may be optimal throughout the research process - from investigating which research questions to pursue to every step of the experiment itself, as Jean-Claude Bradley has demonstrated with his Blogger Lab Notebook experiment. As an example f how this works: if there is a better research method, why not find out before you do the experiment - not after it is finished and you believe the work is complete and ready for publication?

Another way to look at this is that peer review is really a form of collaboration, of researchers working together, critiquing and supporting each other. Why not work openly and collaboratively together as peers throughout the research process, rather than submitting finished work for blind peer review when it is finished?

There likely are differences in potential for rapid change in different research areas. For example, in an area which bridges pharmacology and toxicology, where a slight error could be fatal - let's be careful with our quality controls, and keep traditional peer review until a better method is found. Most areas of research, however, have no such dire consequences, and there is no reason not to move forward, and experiment with new methods.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Creating a Digital Commons

Date created: 
2006-04-21
Abstract: 

The phrase information commons refers to our shared knowledge base. Heather Morrison presents examples of the commons in action, ranging from open access and open source scholarly resources to the blogosphere. The concept of sampling in music is discussed, and applied to librarianship. Key policy for the commons are identified and discussed, including open access, telecommunications issues (net neutrality, access issues), and copyright laws that facilitate sharing.

Olivier Charbonneau presents "tools for the shepherd", or when digital projects are fit for collaboration, in the context of Lessig's regulatory framework, Benkler's "commons based peer production" framework, and Alter's "Work Centered Analysis Framework for Systems Analysis". The Canadian Legal Information Institute (CANLII), created to enable free access to authoritative versions of Canadian case law and statutes on the Internet through a uniform search interface, is presented as an example of a collaboratively produced digital commons.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Libraries Sharing Technology for Sharing

File(s): 
Date created: 
2006-04-22
Abstract: 

Recent resource sharing technology developments in the western Canadian consortia, BC Electronic Library Network and COPPUL are discussed. Highlights include the shelf status project of BC ELN, combining the functionality of a union catalogue with live lookup of circulation status via Z39.50, a tagging feature for the locally developed A to Z list CJDB (CUFTS Journal Database), a locally developed federated search tool, dbwiz, the Open Journal Systems software of the Public Knowledge Project, and the COPPUL Animated Tutorials Sharing Project.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Research, IT and SFU Library

Author: 
File(s): 
Date created: 
2006-05-08
Abstract: 

Beyond traditional support for research, SFU Library provides a variety of other services. These include software support such as reSearcher (federated searching, link resolving, requesting and citation management)and the PKP suite (OJS, OCS and metadata harvester), institutional repository for research results and supporting documents, and digitized collections and digitization support.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Open Access for the Medical Librarian

File(s): 
Date created: 
2006-05-14
Abstract: 

The most important aspects of open access for the medical librarian are presented. Reasons for open access include access to research information, access to taxpayer-funded research, facilitation of evidence-based medicine, equity of access, promotion of author control, and controlling library costs. The two primary approaches to open access, via author self-archiving and open access publishing, are presented. Key open access policy developments are highlighted. Many of the major policy initiatives of the moment are from the research funders. From the researcher funders' point of view, open access means more research impact, more real-world impact when professionals can access the literature, and value is illustrated to the taxpayer, building support for further research funding. The world's largest medical research funders, including the U.S. National Institute of Health and the Wellcome Trust, have public access policies, and many more policies are in development. For example, two weeks ago the Federal Research Public Access Act was introduced in the U.S. Senate. One of the essential elements of open access policy is ensuring that researchers are required, not requested, to deposit works. In Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research has a policy in development called Access to Products of Research; public comments are due May 15, 2006. The dramatic growth of open access - over 2,220 journals in DOAJ, over 7.3 million items in an OAIster search - is discussed, as is the idea of new roles for librarians in an open access environment.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Academic Libraries & IT depts in the Open Source Environment: the Management viewpoint

Date created: 
2007-06-11
Abstract: 

Academic libraries who use open source software have particular requirements in their relationship with campus IT departments.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

From the Big Picture to Those Pesky Details: Starting a Digitization Project in Your Library

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006-04-20
Abstract: 

Outlines the major issues a library must consider when planning a digitization project.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Revolution in the stacks: A bibliography of selected multimedia anarchist resources in English

Author: 
Date created: 
2004-03-01
Abstract: 

Provides a selective bibliography of English language multimedia resources for librarians, teachers, students, and activists interested in anarchism. Includes lists of suggested books,
encyclopedias, journals, music, Web sites, e-books, videos, and indexes, as well as selection tools to assist librarians in developing anarchist collections.

Document type: 
Article