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How Much Research Shared On Facebook Happens Outside Of Public Pages And Groups? A Comparison of Public and Private Online Activity around PLOS ONE Papers

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-05-04
Abstract: 

Despite its undisputed position as the biggest social media platform, Facebook has never entered the main stage of altmetrics research. In this study, we argue that the lack of attention by altmetrics researchers is due, in part, to the challenges in collecting Facebook data regarding activity that takes place outside of public pages and groups. We present a new method of collecting aggregate counts of shares, reactions, and comments across the platform—including users’ personal timelines—and use it to gather data for all articles published between 2015 to 2017 in the journal PLOS ONE. We compare the gathered data with altmetrics collected and aggregated by Altmetric. The results show that 58.7% of papers shared on Facebook happen outside of public spaces and that, when collecting all shares, the volume of activity approximates patterns of engagement previously only observed for Twitter. Both results suggest that the role and impact of Facebook as a medium for science and scholarly communication has been underestimated. Furthermore, they emphasize the importance of openness and transparency around the collection and aggregation of altmetrics.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Yer A Reader, Harry: HP Reread Podcasts as Digital Reading Communities

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-05-01
Abstract: 

The emergence of reread podcasts – in which hosts revisit a favourite book or series, inviting listeners to reread alongside them – offers insight into new digital reading communities that often emerge around active fandoms. Focusing on the popular sub-genre of Harry Potter reread podcasts, this paper asks what lessons these new reading communities can teach us about the practice of rereading, the capacity of podcasts to create new kinds of interactive publics, the link between podcasts and fan communities, and the roles these podcasts play in readers’ lives. Interactive and participatory yet structured around the expertise of the host, reread podcasts have the potential to become pedagogical and thus transformative online spaces.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Digitizing the Banal: The Politics of Recovery in Periodical Studies

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018-05-22
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Bundling, Reprinting, and Reframing: Serial Practices Across Borders

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018
Abstract: 

This article explores the circulation of periodical material between metropolitan and regional locations in early twentieth-century North America. It asks how the globalized consumer technology of the household magazine was being taken up outside of cosmopolitan centers through the framework of local, regional, or national concerns. For example, mainstream Canadian monthlies such as The Western Home Monthly and Maclean's frequently engaged with, or re-used, content and formats taken from New York publications. To understand these transnational publishing dynamics, we argue, it is crucial to attend to the material practices of magazines. The article analyzes several such practices, including both editorial and sales strategies. We look at the reprinting or reframing of complete features and of excerpts from other periodicals. We examine the simultaneous serialization of novels in American and Canadian publications, using a case study of Martha Ostenso's Wild Geese. And we offer the first critical discussion of “bundling,” whereby US and Canadian titles were packaged together as a single subscription. It argues that the affordances of seriality, particularly timeliness and increased circulation through decreasing prices, allowed editors to redeploy metropolitan print materials for a regional readership eager to imagine themselves as participants in the new project of modernity.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Making Headlines: An Analysis of US Government-Funded Cancer Research Mentioned In Online Media

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-02-03
Abstract: 

Objective To characterise how online media coverage of journal articles on cancer funded by the US government varies by cancer type and stage of the cancer control continuum and to compare the disease prevalence rates with the amount of funded research published for each cancer type and with the amount of media attention each receives.

Design A cross-sectional study. Setting The United States. Participants The subject of analysis was 11 436 journal articles on cancer funded by the US government published in 2016. These articles were identified via PubMed and characterised as receiving online media attention based on data provided by Altmetric. Results 16.8% (n=1925) of articles published on US government-funded research were covered in the media. Published journal articles addressed all common cancers. Frequency of journal articles differed substantially across the common cancers, with breast cancer (n=1284), lung cancer (n=630) and prostate cancer (n=586) being the subject of the most journal articles. Roughly one-fifth to one-fourth of journal articles within each cancer category received online media attention. Media mentions were disproportionate to actual burden of each cancer type (ie, incidence and mortality), with breast cancer articles receiving the most media mentions. Scientific articles also covered the stages of the cancer continuum to varying degrees. Across the 13 most common cancer types, 4.4% (n=206) of articles focused on prevention and control, 11.7% (n=550) on diagnosis and 10.7% (n=502) on therapy. Conclusions Findings revealed a mismatch between prevalent cancers and cancers highlighted in online media. Further, journal articles on cancer control and prevention received less media attention than other cancer continuum stages. Media mentions were not proportional to actual public cancer burden nor volume of scientific publications in each cancer category. Results highlight a need for continued research on the role of media, especially online media, in research dissemination.

Objective To characterise how online media coverage of journal articles on cancer funded by the US government varies by cancer type and stage of the cancer control continuum and to compare the disease prevalence rates with the amount of funded research published for each cancer type and with the amount of media attention each receives.

Design A cross-sectional study. Setting The United States. Participants The subject of analysis was 11 436 journal articles on cancer funded by the US government published in 2016. These articles were identified via PubMed and characterised as receiving online media attention based on data provided by Altmetric. Results 16.8% (n=1925) of articles published on US government-funded research were covered in the media. Published journal articles addressed all common cancers. Frequency of journal articles differed substantially across the common cancers, with breast cancer (n=1284), lung cancer (n=630) and prostate cancer (n=586) being the subject of the most journal articles. Roughly one-fifth to one-fourth of journal articles within each cancer category received online media attention. Media mentions were disproportionate to actual burden of each cancer type (ie, incidence and mortality), with breast cancer articles receiving the most media mentions. Scientific articles also covered the stages of the cancer continuum to varying degrees. Across the 13 most common cancer types, 4.4% (n=206) of articles focused on prevention and control, 11.7% (n=550) on diagnosis and 10.7% (n=502) on therapy. Conclusions Findings revealed a mismatch between prevalent cancers and cancers highlighted in online media. Further, journal articles on cancer control and prevention received less media attention than other cancer continuum stages. Media mentions were not proportional to actual public cancer burden nor volume of scientific publications in each cancer category. Results highlight a need for continued research on the role of media, especially online media, in research dissemination.

 

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Survey Results for Yer a Reader, Harry: Reread Podcasts as Digital Reading Communities

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-01-15
Abstract: 

This spreadsheet contains the results of a survey conducted with the SFU WebSurvey tool between May 22 and June 18, 2018. The survey received 556 anonymous responses, all of which are included in this spreadsheet. The questionnaire, including all of the questions asked in the survey, is also included for cross-referencing.

Document type: 
Other

Collecting, Calculating and Displaying Altmetrics with Open Source

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018-09-28
Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Can third-party observers detect the emotional rewards of generous spending?

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-02-20
Abstract: 

Can others detect the emotional consequences of our personal choices? Here we investigate whether third-party observers can detect the emotional benefits of two factors shown to influence self-reported happiness: the speed with which people make decisions, and the generosity of spending choices. Participants were randomly assigned to purchase a goody bag either for themselves or for a sick child, and to choose the contents of this goody bag either as quickly as possible, or by taking as much time as needed. After, participants reported their current emotional state, and were rated for happiness by a research assistant blind to their spending condition. Analyses revealed that purchasing a gift for someone else not only improved participants’ self-reported mood, but that observers could detect these affective differences as well. Observers also rated participants who made their spending decision more quickly as happier, although participants did not report these emotional differences.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Identifying Diffusion Patterns of Research Articles on Twitter: A Case Study of Online Engagement with Open Access Articles

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018-04-02
Abstract: 

The growing presence of research shared on social media, coupled with the increase in freely available research, invites us to ask whether scientific articles shared on platforms like Twitter diffuse beyond the academic community. We explore a new method for answering this question by identifying 11 articles from two open access biology journals that were shared on Twitter at least 50 times and by analyzing the follower network of users who tweeted each article. We find that diffusion patterns of scientific articles can take very different forms, even when the number of times they are tweeted is similar. Our small case study suggests that most articles are shared within single-connected communities with limited diffusion to the public. The proposed approach and indicators can serve those interested in the public understanding of science, science communication, or research evaluation to identify when research diffuses beyond insular communities.

 

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Introducing Texture: An Open Source WYSIWYG Javascript Editor for JATS

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-04-26
Abstract: 

Texture is a WYSIWYG editor app that allows users to turn raw content into structured content, and add as much semantic information as needed for the production of scientific publications. Texture is open source software built on top of Substance (http://substance.io), an advanced Javascript content authoring library. While the Substance library is format agnostic, the Texture editor uses JATS XML as a native exchange format. The Substance library that Texture is built on already supports real-time collaborative authoring, and the easy-to-use WYSIWYG interface would make Texture an attractive alternative to Google Docs. For some editors, the interface could be toggled to more closely resemble a professional XML suite, allowing a user to pop out a raw attribute editor for any given element. Textureauthored documents could then be brought into the journal management system directly, skipping the conversion step, and move straight into a document-centric publishing workflow.

 

Document type: 
Article
File(s):