IPinCH Community-Based Initiatives: Final Reports

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Through collaborative partnerships with Indigenous people around the world, the IPinCH Project has supported a number of Community-Based Initatives (CBI). In our CBIs, team members worked closely with communities to investigate and address pressing cultural heritage challenges in specific contexts. We value a collaborative approach and employ Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) methods that engage the community in all aspects of the research process. The CBI final reports and project summaries were created to provide a respectful and equitable manner in which to share the knowledge created with communities, researchers, and other stakeholders as they work together to address emerging issues in cultural heritage.

A Case of Access: Inuvialuit Engagement with the Smithsonian's MacFarlane Collection (Project Summary)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

Inuvialuit elders, youth, and cultural experts worked with anthropologists, museum curators and others to generate and document Inuvialuit and curatorial knowledge about objects collected from the Anderson River region in Canada’s Western Arctic by Hudson Bay trader Roderick McFarlane in the 1860s, now housed at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Sharing and disseminating this knowledge in Inuvialuit communities, through anthropological networks, and to a broader public was an integral part of this IPinCH Community Initiative. 

Document type: 
Report

A Case of Access: Inuvialuit Engagement with the Smithsonian's MacFarlane Collection (Full Report)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

Inuvialuit elders, youth, and cultural experts worked with anthropologists, museum curators and others to generate and document Inuvialuit and curatorial knowledge about objects collected from the Anderson River region in Canada’s Western Arctic by Hudson Bay trader Roderick McFarlane in the 1860s, now housed at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Sharing and disseminating this knowledge in Inuvialuit communities, through anthropological networks, and to a broader public was an integral part of this IPinCH Community Initiative. 

Document type: 
Report