New Summit website coming in May 2021!

                   Check the SFU library website for updates.

Simon Fraser University Vancity Office of Community Engagement

Receive updates for this collection

Gas Imaginary Conversations No. 1 — with Denise Ferreira da Silva

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-11
Abstract: 

Denise Ferreira da Silva’s academic and artistic work address the ethico-political challenges of the global present. Her publications include Toward a Global Idea of Race (University of Minnesota Press, 2007), A Dívida Impagavel (Oficina da Imaginaçāo Política and Living Commons, 2019), Unpayable Debt (Stenberg/MIT Press, forthcoming) and as co-editor with Paula Chakravartty, Race, Empire, and the Crisis of the Subprime (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013). Her artistic practice includes filmworks Serpent Rain (2016)and 4Waters-Deep Implicancy (2018), in collaboration with Arjuna Neuman; in addition to the ongoing relational project, Poethical Readings and Sensing Salon, in collaboration with Valentina Desideri. She is a professor and Director of the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia.

Document type: 
Audio

Gas Imaginary Conversations No. 2 — with Tania Willard & Kanahus Manuel

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-25
Abstract: 

Tania Willard, Secwepemc Nation, works as an artist and curator within the shifting ideas of contemporary and traditional as it relates to cultural arts and production. She often engages bodies of knowledge and skills that are conceptually linked to her interest in intersections between Aboriginal and other cultures. Her curatorial work includes Beat Nation: Art Hip Hop and Aboriginal Culture (http://www.vanartgallery.bc.ca/the_exhibitions/exhibit_beat_nation.html), a national touring exhibition first presented at Vancouver Art Gallery in 2011 as well as residencies at grunt gallery and Kamloops Art Gallery. She is currently assistant professor in Creative Studies at University of British Columbia Okanagan (Kelowna BC). She also founded and operates BUSH gallery, a conceptual space for land-based art and action led by Indigenous artists.

Kanahus Manuel belongs to the Secwepemc Nation and founded the Tiny House Warrior movement as part of her ongoing work as an Indigenous water and land defender. She is also a member of the Secwepemc Women’s Warrior Society. Her family has led the struggle for rights and sovereignty in Secwepemcul’ecw (territory of the Secwepemc people) for generations. Her late father Arthur Manuel, a former Secwepemc chief and residential school survivor, was an author and global champion for Indigenous rights and title in Canada and abroad. Her late grandfather George Manuel was the second president of the National Indian Brotherhood (now the Assembly of First Nations) and founding president of the World Council of Indigenous Peoples. 

Document type: 
Audio

Border and Rule — with Harsha Walia

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-30
Abstract: 

Harsha Walia is a South Asian activist and writer based in Vancouver, unceded Coast Salish Territories. She has been involved in community-based grassroots migrant justice, feminist, anti-racist, Indigenous solidarity, anti-capitalist, Palestinian liberation, and anti-imperialist movements, including No One is Illegal and Women’s Memorial March Committee. She is formally trained in law, and has worked with women in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. She is the author of Undoing Border Imperialism (2013) and Border and Rule: Global Migration, Capitalism and the Rise of Racist Nationalism. She currently works as Executive Director of the BC Civil Liberties Association.

Document type: 
Audio

Poverty Reduction Through Cash Transfers — with Claire Williams

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-23
Abstract: 

Claire Elizabeth Williams is the Co-Founder and CEO of Foundations for Social Change (FSC), a charitable organization whose mission is to advance social change through evidence-based research and innovation. She is the driving force behind the New Leaf Project, North America’s first direct-giving pilot with people experiencing homelessness, which has made an impact on the global stage. 

Inspired to be a positive force for change, Claire is dedicated to cultivating compassionate communities and advancing new models of leadership. In 2021 she was named one of the Top 25 Women of Influence™, an award that recognizes the extraordinary accomplishments of Canada’s diverse women role models. In 2020, Claire was placed on the 21 Founders to Watch list prepared by “The Future of Good” – Canada’s leading digital publication covering the world of social impact.

Prior to Foundations for Social Change, Claire worked as an environmental consultant where she had the opportunity to collaborate with Indigenous Peoples, the private sector companies, and government to promote environmental protection, corporate responsibility and sustainable land-use. During this time, she honed her skills in relationship building, strategic planning and project management. Claire holds a BA (High Distinction) in Environmental Studies and Economics from Carleton University and Master of Planning with Distinction from Dalhousie University.

Document type: 
Audio

La Commune 2021 — with Roxanne Panchasi and Brit Bachmann

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-19
Abstract: 

About La Commune 2021

From March 18th through early June 2021, writer and scholar Roxanne Panchasi will be hosting a virtual free school focused on the Paris Commune of 1871 in collaboration with UNIT/PITT Society for Art and Critical Awareness. 

Lasting 10-12 weeks, the free school will be open to the wider public. Anyone can participate by taking in the content shared each week, by attending online events (including screenings, discussions, and presentations by special guests, etc.). Participants can follow the whole of the school's run and/or drop in to check out specific materials or happenings on offer. How much or how little of the free school experience participants engage with is entirely up to them. Free in this instance means without charge, but also without course/attendance requirements, assignments, grades or participant evaluation of any kind.

Roxanne Panchasi

Roxanne is an Associate Professor of History at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada who specializes in the twentieth and twenty-first century France, and the French empire, and its legacies. Her first book, Future Tense: The Culture of Anticipation in France Between the Wars was published by Cornell University Press in 2009. She has written on a range of subjects including: nineteenth-century graphology, prosthetics, the Paris Commune, experimental film, and the teaching of History. Her current book project focuses on the cultural politics of French nuclear weapons and testing in the Algerian Sahara. In it, she examines military, scientific, diplomatic, literary, audio-visual, testimonial, and memorial sources as a broad archive of the”French” bomb in empire. Her most recent article, ‘“No Hiroshima in Africa”: The Algerian War and the Question of French Nuclear Tests in the Sahara’ appeared in the Spring 2019 issue of History Present. In 2013, Dr. Panchasi launched New Books in French Studies, a podcast channel featuring discussions with scholars of France and the Francophone world about their latest books that she hosts on the New Books Network. 

Brit Bachmann

Brit Bachmann is a multidisciplinary artist who writes, draws, and throws clay in Vancouver, Canada, on unceded land belonging to the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations. She is the Executive Director of UNIT/PITT Society for Art & Critical Awareness, and co-founder of ReIssue with Casey Wei. Brit has previously worked in administration and outreach at VIVO Media Arts Centre, Capture Photography Festival, The Cinematheque; and notably, as Editor-In-Chief of Discorder Magazine (2015-18). She has served on the programming committee of CFRO Vancouver Co-op Radio (2015-18), and the Polaris Music Prize jury (2016-19). Brit is a member of the Board of Directors of VIVO Media Arts Centre, and the Pacific Association of Artist Run Centres (PAARC). She has a Bachelor of Fine Art from the University of British Columbia–Okanagan.

Document type: 
Audio

Communicating Scientific Uncertainty About COVID-19 — with Alice Fleerackers

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-16
Abstract: 

Alice Fleerackers is a freelance writer, a researcher at the ScholCommLab, the Communications Officer at Art the Science, and a Science in Society Editor at Science Borealis. As a doctoral student at Simon Fraser University, she is working under the supervision of Dr. Juan Pablo Alperin to explore how controversial science is communicated in the digital sphere.

With degrees in psychology and publishing, Alice is passionate about bringing research into everyday life. As a professional communicator and researcher, she’s had the pleasure of interviewing psychologists, scientists, and many others on everything from the psychology of cat video addiction to the science behind astrological belief. She’s also worked as a magazine editor, a newspaper writer, and a book publicist, and has contributed to outlets such as the Globe and Mail,Nautilus, and more.

Document type: 
Audio

Access to Knowledge for Community Scholars — with Heather De Forest

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-09
Abstract: 

Heather is a librarian at Simon Fraser University. She leads the Community Scholars Program, which engages individuals working in the non-profit sector with research publications and identifies and reduces barriers to accessing and using this body of knowledge. Heather is a co-investigator with the STOREE (Supporting Transparent and Open Research Engagement and Exchange) project and a member of the steering committee for the Making Research Accessible initiative.

Document type: 
Audio

Ethical Living in the Anthropocene — with David Chang

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-02
Abstract: 

David Chang is a teacher educator, and PhD candidate in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University. He researches contemplative approaches to environmental education. David Chang lives in Vancouver.

Document type: 
Audio

Keeping Culture Alive Through Song — with Russell Wallace

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-02-23
Abstract: 

Russell Wallace is an award-winning composer, producer and traditional singer from the Lil’wat Nation. His music can be heard on soundtracks for film, television and theatre/dance productions across Canada and the USA. Wallace is one of the founding members of the Aboriginal Writers Collective West Coast and is an alumnus of the UBC Creative Writing program. Wallace has written poetry, short fiction, theatre, and music theatre. Wallace was the artist in residence at the Vancouver International Jazz Festival in 2019, a guest programmer for Word Vancouver and was the artistic director for the Aboriginal Electronic Music Festival for a number of years.

Document type: 
Audio

Rechanneling Desires for Indigeneity — with New Red Order

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-02-16
Abstract: 

Adam Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist who lives and works in Brooklyn. His practice attempts to subvert traditional forms of ethnography through humor, relation, and transgression. Khalil’s work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, Sundance Film Festival, Walker Arts Center, Lincoln Center, Tate Modern, Toronto Biennial and Whitney Biennial, among other institutions. Khalil is a core contributor to New Red Order (NRO) and a co-founder of COUSINS Collective. Khalil is the recipient of various fellowships and grants, including but not limited to: Sundance Art of Nonfiction, Jerome Artist Fellowship, and Gates Millennium Scholarship. Khalil received his BA from Bard College.

Zack Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, currently based in Brooklyn, NY. His work often explores an indigenous worldview and undermines traditional forms of historical authority through the excavation of alternative histories and the use of innovative documentary forms. He recently completed a B.A. at Bard College in the Film and Electronic Arts Department and is a UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow and Gates Millennium Scholar.

Jackson Polys is a visual artist who seeks to dissolve artificial boundaries between perceptions of traditional Native art forms, practices, and contemporary life, and whose practice reflects an inquiry into the limits and viability of desires for indigenous growth. Prior to pursuing his undergraduate education in New York he worked as Alaska-based artist Stron Softi, with solo exhibitions at the Alaska State Museum and the Anchorage Museum, and has been engaged by museums seeking replacements for repatriated works. He obtained a BA in Art History and Visual Arts from Columbia University (2013) and holds an MFA in Visual Arts from Columbia University (2015). He is the recipient of a 2017 NACF Mentor Artist Fellowship and Advisor to Indigenous New York, the collaborative program initiative co-founded by Mohawk artist Alan Michelson and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics.

Document type: 
Audio