Publishing Program - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Digital publishing: how publishers can monetize content on the web

File(s): 
Date created: 
2010-08-19
Supervisor(s): 
John Maxwell
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Master of Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project Report) M.Pub.
Abstract: 

This paper seeks to illustrate how publishers can take their existing knowledge, expertise and content, and use online tools that are readily available to monetize their content online. By looking at two case studies – Boxcar Marketing and its online marketing training program and Capulet Communications and its ebook, both which are projects that monetize the companies’ content – the paper explores tactics and best practices for building an online business strategy around content monetization. More specifically, the paper describes the details of feasible online business strategies. This paper is meant as a how-to, to show how publishers can take advantage of the web to create sustainable online business models based on monetizing content online. The paper provides a workable business case that sorts out the details of online publishing strategies for others to use and build upon.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

Content re-creation: Repurposing magazine content for the web

File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Mary Schendlinger
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project Report) M.Pub.
Abstract: 

This report investigates the online editorial activities of three Canadian design magazines: Style at Home, Canadian House and Home, and Western Living. It explores the way these magazines utilize social media and their respective websites to repurpose editorial content from the print magazine. Each case is examined closely to illustrate the approaches available to a magazine when extending their content – or creating new content – online. The magazines are looked at within the context of the current publishing industry, and the report takes into consideration the challenges this industry faces when it comes to reaching online readers and measuring the success of Internet initiatives. The purpose of this study is to discover how three similar Canadian magazines are integrating social media and websites into their daily publishing activities, how these actions relate to content found within the print magazine and how this fits within the context of the publishing industry.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

Nine years and counting : the Canadian magazine industry faces the Internet

Author: 
File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003
Abstract: 

This project report discusses the status and relative importance of web properties toCanadian magazines nine years after the first magazine website appeared in the industry.

The report starts by describing, in overview, the history of the impact of other media on magazines, including film, radio, television and the Internet. Canadian magazine publishers' attitudes towards their web properties is then detailed, from the early days of online magazines in 1994 to the present. Topics discussed include the trend toward integrating print and web functions, the editorial content of the magazines' websites, measures of success used for the web and current attitudes toward the Internet as a competitive medium.

Western Living and Vancouver magazines are examined as case studies. web plans were designed for each magazine as a means of applying the information gathered in this project report, and illustrating the demands of a publisher in regards to his/her web property. The report concludes with a discussion of the status of magazine publishers and their web properties in 2003.

 

Document type: 
Thesis

The Small Magazines Office of Magazines Canada 2003-2007

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project
Abstract: 

After roughly 4 years of operations, Magazines Canada initiated a strategic review of its Small Magazines Office (SMO). The object of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the SMO in serving Magazines Canada member needs. The strategic review considered the strengths and weaknesses of the SMO and proposed that the SMO was inefficient and not serving a unique need. It also proposed that the definition of a “small magazine” was outmoded. A set of recommendations for a new strategy in member service was proposed to and accepted by the Board of Directors and then the membership. Implementing these recommendations resulted in the closure of the Small Magazines Office and the creation of the Cultural Magazines Committee.

Document type: 
Thesis

This is why you turn it into paper : making a book from forgetmagazine.com

Author: 
File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Supervisor(s): 
Valerie Frith
Department: 
Communication, Art and Technology: Canadian Centre for Studies in Publishing
Thesis type: 
(Research project) M.Pub.
Document type: 
Thesis

Marketing a message : Harry Potter and the role of marketing and publicity in Raincoast Books' ancient-forest-friendly initiative

Author: 
File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003
Supervisor(s): 
Valerie Frith
Department: 
Communication, Art and Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
Project (M. Pub.)
Document type: 
Thesis

Branding the borzoi : imprint branding and the Knopf Canada list/

Author: 
File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003
Supervisor(s): 
Rowland M. Lorimer
Department: 
Communication, Art and Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
Project (MPub)
Document type: 
Thesis

The art and science of choosing literary books that sell : acquisitions decision-making at Penguin UK

Author: 
File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003
Supervisor(s): 
Valerie Frith
Department: 
Communication, Art and Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
Project (MPub)
Document type: 
Thesis

Marketing a Message: Harry Potter and the Role of Marketing and Publicity in Raincoast Books' Ancient-Forest-Friendly Initiative

Author: 
File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004-03-17
Supervisor(s): 
Valerie Frith
Department: 
Communication, Art and Technology:Master of Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
Graduating extended essay/Research project: M. Pub.
Abstract: 

On June 21, 2003, Raincoast Books released the Canadian edition of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, the fifth installment of the extremely popular series of novels by J.K. Rowling. Raincoast was the only one of fifty-five publishers of Harry Potter worldwide to print the book on 100-percent post-consumer recycled, ancient-forest-friendly paper. Raincoast decided to publicize its commitment to printing on ancient-forest-friendly paper by launching a media campaign on the subject just a few weeks before the release of Harry Potter. Taking advantage of the popularity and media hype surrounding Harry Potter, Raincoast was able to garner attention—from both the media and individuals—for the company's pledge to become an environmentally responsible enterprise and for the issues that initially provoked its decision to make such a commitment. This report explores environmental issues concerning the current state of ancient forests worldwide; the impact of the book publishing industry on ancient forests; and Canadian consumers’ opinions on environmentally responsible paper usage in book publishing. This report documents and examines the changes that have occurred in Canada since an environmental coalition, Markets Initiative, began its ancient-forest-friendly campaign with Canadian book publishers in 2001, and the ripples that are being felt—by publishers, printers, paper manufacturers and the public—since Raincoast’s launch of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.

Document type: 
Thesis

The 2003 Relaunch of Vancouver Magazine

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004-03-15
Supervisor(s): 
Valerie Frith
Department: 
Communication, Art and Technology: Master of Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
Graduating extended essay/Research project. M. Pub.
Abstract: 

This project report examines the 2003 relaunch of Vancouver magazine. It provides an overview of the magazine’s 35-year history, as well as an analysis of its current state: editorial, advertising, circulation, readership and competition. The report also offers an inside account of the strategic planning that went into the relaunch, including: findings from a July 2002 competitive analysis of Toronto Life, Canada’s preeminent city magazine; highlights from a November 2002 Vancouver magazine subscriber survey; and a chronicle of various planning meetings, held within Transcontinental Media West, between July and December 2002. This report evaluates Vancouver magazine’s prospects for a successful relaunch within the framework of the two city magazine studies, each of which addresses the role and purpose of a city magazine. Questions and findings from those studies are then posed to three editors of Vancouver magazine (past and present), who offer an analysis of the city magazine research within the context of their specific experiences at the magazine. This project report serves as a case study of the magazine relaunch process, but it does not attempt to evaluate the success of this particular relaunch. It offers general lessons and observations for those interested in launching or relaunching a city magazine, and specific lessons and observations for those interested in the future of Vancouver magazine.

Document type: 
Thesis