Publishing Program - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Gekiga into English: translating the words, images, and culture of Yoshihiro Tatsumi’s A Drifting Life

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This project report examines how the editorial process of a graphic novel can turn conventional practices of editing text in English in entirely new directions, not only incorporating traditional text-editing techniques, but also applying these familiar principles to meet the rhetorical and spatial demands of a visual narrative. This process is explored in depth by detailing the editorial process used by Drawn & Quarterly, a literary comics publishing company, in bringing Yoshihiro Tatsumi’s Japanese-language graphic novel, A Drifting Life, to an English-speaking audience, particularly with respect to the visual, textual, and cultural differences that must be respected when translating a graphic novel from Japanese to English, and how the different reading and comprehension needs of the two audiences have affected the physical, visual, and textual structure of the book.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
M
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project Report (M.Pub.)

Teething the Walrus: circulation management at a post-launch Canadian magazine

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This report focuses on circulation dynamics of The Walrus magazine during the post-launch period, an often neglected but crucial time period in the life cycle of a magazine looking for long-term success. The Walrus’s circulation strategy highlights trends and changes in the Canadian magazine industry at a medium-sized independent magazine.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
R
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project Report (M.Pub.)

Trading pages: using software to manage editorial workflows at small cultural magazines

Author: 
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This report is a study of editorial workflow practices and the use of editorial workflow software at small Canadian magazines. Seven magazines were surveyed about their current staff and working environments, their editorial workflow practices, and the use of software to manage workflow. The magazines were also asked to evaluate their current workflow and explain their attitudes towards workflow software. This report also reviews several existing workflow software packages with an eye towards their suitability for a small magazine environment, including a discussion of cost, feature set, and ease of use. Based on the reviews and the requirements derived from the workflow models of the magazines surveyed, this report finally explores the possibility of developing new workflow software tailored for small magazines, describing basic requirements and guidelines for future software development.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project Report (M.Pub.)

Magazines move online: the Mother Jones web model

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This report analyzes the trends in online publishing and how they have affected news media, focusing on the evolution of the Website for Mother Jones magazine. Established in 1974, the magazine has a history of reporting on American politics and international issues from a progressive perspective. Beginning in 2007, the magazine began a three-phased relaunch of its Website. The report examines the Mother Jones Web model for its success in building an online presence for the Website capable of performing the following important functions: offering in-depth content and reporting on breaking news events in a timely fashion, interacting with readers and building social networks, and establishing a recognizable brand that stands out in the media landscape.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project Report (M.Pub.)

Raising the Revenue at a Small-Circulation Magazine: Geist Magazine Pursues National Advertisers

Author: 
Date created: 
2004
Abstract: 

This paper is based on research I conducted during the internship I d ~ d at Geist in the summer of 2004. As directed by Craig hggs for Geist, I worked on various special projects related to the magazine's pursuit of national advertisers. This project report explores why this is an opportune time for Geist to pursue national advertisers, as well as the challenges and opportunities the magazine faces. It outlines what makes a magazine a desirable medium for advertisers. It delves into the relationship between small magazines and their readers. It describes two ways in which advertising can appear in magazines: &splay advertising and corporate sponsorship. The project report also explains the steps Geist has taken and is taking in its pursuit of national advertisers: readership surveys and external evaluations in the form of Print Measurement Bureau analysis and a circulation audt.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project Report (M.Pub.)

Going digital: a guide for book publishers

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This project report, structured as a guide, strives to inspire and assist small-to-mid-sized Canadian trade publishers to develop their digital strategies. The need for digitization in a period of transition within the publishing industry is explored, as well as the different steps to be taken to create a successful digital strategy. This guide first explores the goals and motivations of digitization, specifically looking at websites, viral marketing, book browsing and searching, and e-books. It then reviews the types of rights necessary for a digital strategy, and the decision making process necessary for the selection of titles to be digitized. Finally, the guide explores the different formats and platforms available for digitization and looks at current efforts to standardize them.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project Report (M.Pub.)

Understanding the Canadian small-magazine landscape: mapping a route to viability for spacing

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

Based on the author’s work as the volunteer business manager of the Canadian small magazine Spacing between September 2005 and September 2007, this report begins with an overview of the magazine-publishing industry in Canada and the challenges this country’s publishers face—with a focus on the additional difficulties particular to producing small-circulation titles. It then describes the author’s experience applying strategic-planning principles at Spacing to help its publishing team address the aforementioned challenges and make a successful transition to producing the magazine as a financially viable small business. The report closes with an evaluation of Spacing’s potential for long-term success and the author’s thoughts on the continued viability of small-magazine publishing in Canada. It makes reference to industry, government, and academic documents, and to the author’s two years working at Spacing. In doing so, this report offers insight into the realities of publishing a small magazine in Canada today.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project Report (M.Pub.)

From conception to the press: considerations for publishing an emergent reader series

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This report is meant as a guideline for publishers interested in creating a series of emergent reader books. It addresses some of the various concerns a publisher will face in the process of producing a line of early reader texts, including concerns related to the determining of book levels, editing, and design and production. It provides detailed descriptions of the various readability and levelling techniques available to publishers, and critiques of each system. It also provides a comprehensive look at many of the editorial matters a publisher needs to consider when planning an emergent reader series, including information on decodability, predictability, and accessibility. Finally, it offers a summary of design and production conventions, with detailed discussions on print specifications and cover and interior design.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project Report (M.Pub.)

A year on The Block: a new magazine for the suburbs – and the city

Author: 
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This project report focuses on the first year of publication of The Block magazine, from April 2006 to April 2007. It examines how an idea played out as a real magazine. The report considers the magazine’s primary areas of circulation, the suburbs, and analyzes them in terms of culture, growth, and potential magazine audiences. The Block’s competition, original editorial content, advertising, production, and circulation are discussed in depth. Additionally, the report examines the genesis of a new edition of The Block for Vancouver. A concluding section outlines changes that were made to The Block after the first one-year period. This report records the evolution of a new magazine. It serves as a case study, and as such, does not offer a guide to how a magazine should evolve, but allows readers to observe the particular way one magazine adapted to its new role in the magazine-publishing market.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
R
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project Report (M.Pub.)

The New Press: A not-for-profit in American publishing

Author: 
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

In 1992, AndrC Schiffrin founded The New Press as a mid-size not-for-profit publisher in hopes that it would provide a viable alternative to mainstream publishing by bringing books into the market which were not normally published by more commercial houses. The press recently celebrated its tenth anniversary in 2002, and though there are many small not-for-profit houses in the United States today, The New Press stands as one of the few mid-size not-for-profits that competes directly with mainstream houses by using similar distribution methods and seeking similar audiences. This project examines The New Press as a not-for-profit in American publishing, beginning with a short history of Schiffrin's experiences leading up to the founding of The New Press. Through the history of the press, its mission, operations, funding structure, and a case study of operations and funding as they apply to one "foundation" title, the strengths and weaknesses of the press are examined, concluding with an examination of the viability of the press's mission of independence through its interaction with donors and foundations.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project Report (M.Pub.)