History - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Spaces of war: The interpretation of landscapes on the western front by first world war German soldiers, 1914 – 1918

Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Although there has been much historical research on the environmental culture of Germany during the pre- and post-World War I periods, there is a substantial gap as far as the war itself is concerned. This paper takes a small step towards addressing that issue by examining middle-class German soldiers’ interpretations of the landscape. It explores the relationship between the utopic vision of the home front and the dystopic vision of the frontline, but it also demonstrates that a complex heterotopic vision of the battlefront’s landscape emerged as an inspiration for post-war cultural regeneration.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
N
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

The desert blossoms as a wasteland: an environmental history of Utah’s west desert

Author: 
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This study illustrates how the isolation and perceived worthlessness of the Great Basin’s West Desert led the military and livestock industry to create a sacrificial landscape. In focusing on the material activities of these two groups, this study also explores vital yet largely neglected issues regarding the tensions between the defense industry, economic prosperity, and ecological health, revealing the largely unacknowledged social and ecological costs of maintaining national security. The narrative traces the nineteenth-century rise of the sheep industry, growing friction between pastoral and national security landscapes in the mid twentieth century, and the social and environmental consequences of Army weapons testing programs during World War II and the Cold War. In focusing on Western settlement and early economic development, as well as the critical period during and after WWII, this study offers an extended view into North Americans’ largely dysfunctional relationship to arid lands.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Seasons of gold: An environmental history of the Cariboo gold rush

Author: 
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Seasons are history’s constant companion. Spring, summer, winter, and fall mark the calendar and define the possibilities of labour and gender. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the pivotal events that unfolded during the Cariboo gold rush of 1862. In a world before climate-controlled homes, miners, Natives, Chinese, and Hurdy Gurdy girls all had to reckon with nature’s rhythms. This thesis explores how seasons, compounded by the contradictory forces of geographical isolation, a global market for gold, and environmental experiences in previous North American rushes, played a key role in how miners and their accompaniments related to nature and to each other. To pursue the latent wealth of the Cariboo, gold miners had to accommodate the region’s seasonal contingencies. The result was a peculiar rhythm of mining that revealed the intricate ways that nature shaped the most northern mining frontier before the Yukon.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The école unique movement in France : hope and disappointment

Date created: 
1991
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of History) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The Polish "sickness" and Franco-Soviet relations, 1934-1939

Date created: 
1997
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of History) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)