Contemporary Arts - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

Receive updates for this collection

Where I heard your voice

Author: 
File(s): 
Appendix B: Video docmentation: WHERE I HEARD YOUR VOICE
Date created: 
2021-11-05
Supervisor(s): 
Laura U. Marks
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.
Abstract: 

WHERE I HEARD YOUR VOICE is an experiment in recasting time as space. The photos of this back-projected photo-collage have been juxtaposed by means of a moving-image approach so that time can be perceived not in a linear manner, but through an infinite number of coexisting, multidirectional paths of undetermined lengths. This medium allows for the creation of “smooth/nomadic” spaces—as described in Deleuze and Guattari’s elaborations on nomadology—for the wandering eye of the viewer. Where I Heard Your Voice is the result of a collaboration/dialogue with a ravine and its myriad inhabitants, including non-human and human traces. The photos have been taken during countless walks in a ravine currently known as Renfrew Ravine. The ravine is located in the traditional territories of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish) and səl̓ílwətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations and it is part of the Still Creek Watershed which enters the qiqéyt (Qayqayt) Nation territories and is traditionally a shared harvesting and gathering place for all four of these Nations.xʷməθkʷəy̓əm

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

books as bodies or bodies as maps

Author: 
File(s): 
Date created: 
2021-10-07
Supervisor(s): 
Peter Dickinson
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.
Abstract: 

Since my move to so-called Canada in 2015, I have reconsidered the way in which the places I have dwelled are bound to the temporal materialities around me. Through my transits in Mexico City, Oaxaca, Corner Brook, St. John’s, and Vancouver, I have come to conceive my body as my primary tool of creation, a site for translation among different systems of value and belief. In books as bodies or bodies as maps I explore this entanglement of embodied relations by repurposing the book as a body and the body as a map. Repurposing Sonja Boon’s biographical novel What the Oceans Remember as a pinhole book/camera, I took photos along the Vancouver shoreline as a gesture of acknowledgment to the water as the common feature for untold human and non-human stories. Resisting containment, I present the documentation of the places I have collected on walks over the course of 2020-21 in postcards, booklets, a map, and a three-channel video. This is the first iteration of an unfolding project in which I constellate and document the places I have transited through (sometimes as a “temporary resident”, sometimes as a citizen) in an attempt to re-see the book as a re-writing device that ultimately affords readers the agency to drift.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

Snare

File(s): 
Date created: 
2020-08-21
Supervisor(s): 
Allyson Clay
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.
Abstract: 

Snare (2020), explores the entangled relationship between visibility, concealment, and the domestic sphere as a site of artistic production. Through the use of pattern, painting and sculpture, Snare takes on the form and function of the decorative screen as a spatial partition, engaging transitive painting practices, the installation features five large sculptures and nine small oil paintings. This research has been concerned with the historical devaluation of decorative arts, ornamentation, the home as a site of artistic production and the military implications of pattern. Snare asks the viewer to consider the boundaries between the public and the private, and to ask what happens when the domestic is transported within the walls of a public gallery space? Snare employs ornamentation, interiority and exteriority to both obscure and reveal vital materialities.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

Our Eyes Will Adjust

Author: 
File(s): 
Date created: 
2021-09-20
Supervisor(s): 
Robert Kitsos
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.
Abstract: 

Our Eyes Will Adjust is an experiential immersive performance and installation. With an attention to perception and embodied seeing, this work explores the multidimensionality of our energetic and material interconnections to the visibly hidden.  The work moves from the perception of the individual self at the center of experience to the Universal Self – woven into the web of Universal matrix which is cyclically governed rather than centrally focused. Influenced by ancestry, nature and new technology, the work is presented in three different settings: live in-person performance, live streamed performance and dance on film.  OEWA is a dance of the in-between dualities of light and darkness, energy and matter, form and formless meet, converse, and entangle.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

Center City Southeast

Author: 
File(s): 
Date created: 
2021-11-03
Supervisor(s): 
Mauricio Pauly
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.
Abstract: 

Center City Southeast is a multi-media performance comprised of sound, video, and short stories. The performance tracks a series of incidental encounters in places—places in which I just happened to be. In the piece, I blend text, video, and sound into a cohesive whole and illuminate surprising relationships between disparate elements. The stories—written accounts of both real and fictionalized encounters—act as guideposts. They articulate uncanny feelings and highlight strange occurrences with memory, nature, and doppelgangers that I experienced while recording the sounds and sights of my environment. Moreover, the sound, video and text trace moments when the banal slips into the bizarre, capturing a broad collection of moments that range from the utterly familiar to the deeply uncanny.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

Curious & curiouser

Author: 
File(s): 
Date created: 
2021-09-21
Supervisor(s): 
Owen Underhill
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.
Abstract: 

Curious & Curiouser is a dual-part project where listening happens in two different “spaces”: the choral composition and in an artist book. Each uses as source material haiku that the artist discovered on her walks through the industrial waterfront area of East Vancouver; the haiku are engraved on red dog tags and nailed to the wooden power poles she encountered along her path. The haiku texts are translated into two spatial forms that make visible the patterns of order in music, braiding visuality with aurality. The choral suite is a kaleidoscopic word painting—a sound sculpture in five movements—staging the sight of sound through choreographic gesture, movement and theatre; a poetry of motion. Composed as a postlude to the suite, the artist book is a part-score for performing listening, the graphic scores and listening events map sound out of sight—a question of how we hear what we see.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

PERSPECTIVALS

Author: 
File(s): 
Date created: 
2021-08-25
Supervisor(s): 
Kyla Gardiner
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.
Abstract: 

Perspectivals is an interior wall installation and an immersive environment comprised of eight freestanding wooden-framed translucent fabric panels immersed in geometric light projections. The choreographed light patterns, integrated with surround soundscape, allow geometric forms to completely recede from perspective as the visitor walks around the work. When the visitor’s perspective shifts or is distorted, a new perception becomes possible. The layers of perception involved in such a space explore the ways that we experience and understand space, and how that understanding shapes our sense of what was once two-dimensional and architectural. This artwork is designed not to be looked at, but looked through. This calls upon viewers’ intuitive perception of the space to experience, beyond simple comprehension, the phenomenal and poetic nature of the work. Perspectivals takes us on a journey from one perceptual state of mind to another, where art lies in perception, and where we open ourselves to the present moment.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

LINK SICK

Author: 
File(s): 
LINK SICK (An Audio-Play by DEBBY FRIDAY)
Date created: 
2021-04-14
Supervisor(s): 
Sabrina Schroeder
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.
Abstract: 

Set against the backdrop of an ambiguous dystopia and eternal rave, LINK SICK is a tale about the threads that bind us together. The piece stems from research around oral traditions of storytelling, the transcendent framework of “erotic potential” and the ever genre-less stylings of “electronic punk music”. The project is a science-fiction exploration of the connective tissue of human experience as well as an experiment in sound art; blurring the lines between theatre, radio, music, fiction, essay, and internet art. Over 42-minutes, listeners are invited to gather round, close their eyes, and open their ears; submerging straight into this strange future peppered with blink-streams, automated protests, disembodied DJs, dancefloor orgies, and only the trendiest S/S 221 G-E two-piece club skins.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

Perennial

Author: 
File(s): 
Date created: 
2020-12-15
Supervisor(s): 
Noé Rodríguez
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.
Abstract: 

The adjective “perennial” suggests something enduring or perpetually renewing. The spirit of the perennial can be found in many traditional Chinese families. Despite illnesses, hardships and separations, being perennial means that one will always find the means to re-root and persevere. Perennial (2020) arrives in two parts. The frontal part interlaces spoken memories of the artist’s grandmother with gestures of returning home captured in Super 8 and 35mm stills and processed digitally. The back of the work weaves together a fictitious narrative using writings found or made on the backs of the photographs, providing the work with an alternative ending.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

KickQueen: The body, the story, and the icon

Author: 
File(s): 
Date created: 
2020-12-14
Supervisor(s): 
Claudette Lauzon
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.
Abstract: 

In the realm of the KickQueens, Malak Alawye breaks time’s cyclicality when she hits an armed man in the crotch. She takes Lebanon out of its traumatic loop and into a linear dimension where progress is possible. KickQueen is a semi-fictional, semi-factual reflection on the icon of the October 2019 uprisings in Beirut. It is a magic potion against forgetting. It asks us to remember: “What does it mean to kick an armed man in the crotch? How does this gesture live in our embodied collective?” Calling on a gesture’s cite-ability, reenactment, and potentiality, the research behind this project addresses the limits of the icon both within and without the body, exposing its representational successes and failures while at the same time investigating how a hybrid narrative can translate into a multi-media installation using video performance, sculpture, and sound.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project