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Guidelines for En Masse Interinstitutional Relocations of Long-term Care Homes: Supporting Resident and Team Member Well-being

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-02-09
Abstract: 

En masse interinstitutional relocations for residents can cause distress, increased behavioural issues, increased health concerns, though for some, there are improvements in health and cognitive functioning. Most negative effects of relocation are temporary and can be mitigated by preparation prior to the move and a supported transition period post-move. The most difficult period is shortly before the move and three to six months post-relocation.

En masse interinstitutional relocations for team members can cause stress related to job security, requirements to learn new operating systems and procedures, establishing new team and working relationships, loss of previous relationships, and the ability to provide care to the same standard as the previous home. Stress that results from such change can lead to burnout, sick leave, and turnover, but can be mitigated by real engagement, consistent and clear communication, and strong management.

En masse interinstitutional relocations for family members can be stressful if they lack sufficient lines of communication and information, and if quality of care appears to deteriorate post-move. When new LTC homes are structured differently, it becomes difficult to locate team members, which is distressing to families (as well as residents and team members). Family stress can be mitigated with clear lines of communication for pre- and post-move concerns, minimizing change, and strong leadership.

Given that change is stressful, planning, engagement, empowerment, human resources, leadership, team building, and communication are critical components for effective en masse relocations of long-term care residents and team members. Planning for change related stress pre- and post-relocation, allowing for sufficient time, support, and resources acknowledges the hard work required to complete the move and supports the well-being of those involved.

Document type: 
Report

Middle-Aged and Older Adults' Information and Communication Technology Access: A Realist Review

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-10-13
Abstract: 

There continues to be a gap in information and communication technologies (ICTs) access and use between younger cohorts that have grown up with the technology (generation X and younger) and the next previous cohort (baby boomers and older). This is more pronounced among cohorts born prior to the 1930s, which have low access and use rates. Birth cohort, education, and income interact to create differences in familiarity, skill, and personal preference such that older adults with more education and higher incomes are more likely to access and use ICTs.

Training and support is one strategy that has been identified as able to increase access and use of ICTs among middle-aged and older adults. However, training needs to be tailored, relevant, and ongoing. Community service organizations that provide training and support require infrastructure support to purchase computers and tablets every three years as new technology emerges. In addition, ongoing funding is required to provide necessary training and support. This could be connected with other home programs, as in-home services are preferable.

Negative stereotypes associated with ageist perspectives of older adults need to be systematically challenged and dispelled through public service campaigns and in mass media. Representations of older adults as incapable of learning how to use ICTs serves to perpetuate the digital divide.

Usable and accessible design can enhance use of ICTs as some adults experience physical challenges such as declines in vision and hearing, and increased arthritis in their hands. Applying principles of universal design, and creating products that are accessible, reliable, and functional for most people, including those with disabilities, can lead to a generation of products that meet the needs of older adults.

Document type: 
Report

Are Human Brains Sexually Dimorphic?

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-04-28
Abstract: 

Machine learning and artificial intelligence tools are on the precipice of becoming a popular method for clinical diagnosis and disease prediction. Their ability to solve specific problems given sets of constraints are unmatched and they provide novel solutions to a plethora of different tasks. This thesis will examine a deep learning image classifiers capability of successfully classifying male and female MR images into their respective counterparts. The results of these models are visualized using a Grad-Cam to help gain insight on the sexual dimorphisms present within the human brain. The models showed sex dimorphisms exist in previously known areas like the frontal, temporal and precuneus gyri along with the cerebellum and thalamus. But other regions such as the cingulate, postcentral, and fusiform gyri illustrated differences not commonly mentioned in literature. This paper deviates away from the traditional statistical approaches of neuroimaging and analysis techniques and provides a new method to draw conclusions on individual volumes.

Document type: 
Thesis

Research Meets Policy: Getting the Media Involved

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-04-12
Abstract: 

This explainer document is the fourth in a four part series based on Research Meets Policy at SFU 2021 - a virtual summer institute hosted by the SFU Knowledge Mobilization Hub.The media is an effective channel for reaching policy makers, as it is a proven way to gain the interest and attention of voters on a particular topic, or as another way to attract the attention of policy makers directly. When short on time, many policy makers rely on trusted voices on Twitter or other media outlets for quick takes on pressing issues. In this explainer, we share how you can get started engaging the media for communicating to policy makers.

Document type: 
Learning object

Research Meets Policy: Writing For Your Audience

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-04-12
Abstract: 

This explainer document is the third in a four part series based on Research Meets Policy at SFU 2021 - a virtual summer institute hosted by the SFU Knowledge Mobilization Hub.Writing for a policy audience is different from academic writing. In this explainer, we share key tips and strategies for writing for a policy audience. We include details on writing a policy brief, a format that is commonly used to communicate research to policy.

Document type: 
Learning object

Research Meets Policy: Connecting With Your Audience

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-04-12
Abstract: 

This explainer document is the second in a four part series based on Research Meets Policy at SFU 2021 - a virtual summer institute hosted by the SFU Knowledge Mobilization Hub.In this explainer, we build on some of the concepts described in our first explainer document by focusing on skills for connecting with stakeholders. The more you listen to your audience, the better your communication and contribution to policy will be. To do this, we must first consider how our own beliefs and experiences influence how we perceive or hear others.

Document type: 
Learning object

Research Meets Policy: Introducing Research Communication

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-04-12
Abstract: 

This explainer document is the first in a four part series based on Research Meets Policy at SFU 2021 - a virtual summer institute hosted by the SFU Knowledge Mobilization Hub.In this explainer, we provide an overview to orient you to research communication in a policy setting. The main goal of research in the policy landscape is to support evidence-informed policy development, that is, to contribute to well-informed decisions to make positive social, economic, and environmental impacts.

Document type: 
Learning object

SFU Knowledge Mobilization Hub Year Two Highlights

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-12-01
Abstract: 

SFU’s Knowledge Mobilization Hub aims to grow a culture of knowledge mobilization (KM) at SFU and contribute to SFU being recognized as a world leader in KM. Year two of the SFU KM Hub has been all about inspiring action and building capacity for KM at SFU through collaborations, instruction, and pre and post award supports. This two-page report provides a snapshot of the key achievements and milestones from October 2020 to September 2021. It outlines five initiatives: the launch of the Knowledge Mobilizers story series; SFU's membership in Research Impact Canada; the start of the SFU Research Impact Work Group; the Research Meets Policy @ SFU summer institute; and finally, a SSHRC grant awarded to the KM Hub. As in Year One, this report highlights three core areas of focus: consultations for KM support & navigation; capacity building training & events; and recognition efforts to highlight SFU mobilizers. The report also documents the number of stakeholders engaged, participants who attended KM workshops, and the amount of funding awarded to proposals supported by the KM Hub over the past year.

Document type: 
Other

The Awe-ful Spectre of Precarity in Libraries

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-08-15
Abstract: 

This presentation explores how vocational awe and ghostly labour intersect with precarious work in libraries and by discussing the potential for action both within and outside of those constraints. What do these explorations reveal about labour structures, library service, and work culture? How are the values of our profession discarded, reaffirmed, or changed? Together with sharing findings from our research project on precarious work in Canadian libraries, this presentation reimagines library labour relationships and otherwise explores solutions to the negative effects of precarity. 

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Community Resource Handbook 2021: A Guide to Community Engaged Research

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-01
Abstract: 

The intention with this handbook is to offer readers a practical and accessible guide for community-engaged research. But it is just that: an offering. It is not a definitive guide or a prescriptive checklist. It is recognized that the beauty and complexity of many CER projects lie in their unique contexts and imaginative approaches. That means a "onesize-fits-all" handbook may not make sense for everyone.

This handbook is for community-serving organizations including, but not limited to, community groups, not-for-profit organizations, public and private foundations and local, provincial and federal government agencies. This handbook is designed to help community organizations gain a practical understanding of community-engaged research. It also provides a guiding framework for developing a CER project.

This handbook can also be useful for students, early-career researchers and anyone who is curious about using research to advance community interests.

Document type: 
Book