Does 'Early Recovery' improve aid?: A literature review on relief-to-development transition

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Keywords: 
Developing countries
Humanitarian assistance
International relief
War and society
Early Recovery
Aid
Humanitarian
Relief
Development
Recovery
Rehabilitation
Reconstruction
Complex emergency
Disaster
New wars
Conflict
Peacebuilding
Participation
Social narrative
Darfur
Afghanistan
Somalia
Iraq.
Abstract: 

Early Recovery represents the suffusion of development principles into the humanitarian relief setting, purportedly improving the overall delivery of aid. But though it is described as a new adaptation of aidwork and solution to the challenge of contemporary emergencies, Early Recovery is ‘too late’: complex emergencies have evolved faster than the debates that produced their solution in Early Recovery. In addition, several challenges to aid are especially relevant in regard to Early Recovery - such as the lack of feedback loops and the erosion of human security. As well, the specific challenges of ‘timing’, ‘funding’ and ‘understanding’ plague Early Recovery, and given that these challenges will ultimately require their own individual adaptations, further debates will likely delay desperately needed solutions to complex emergencies. This paper reviews prevalent challenges to Early Recovery and proposes a means to potentially shorten the length of time it takes aid adaptations to emerge.

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
Copyright remains with the author. The author granted permission for the file to be printed and for the text to be copied and pasted.
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
J
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)
Statistics: