State builders, nation destroyers? Clans and national cohesion in Central Asia

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Keywords: 
Clans
Asia, Central
Politics and Government
Soviet Union
History
Social Conditions
Central Asia
Clans
Nation building
National identity
Democratic transition
Conflict
Abstract: 

Contrary to prevailing theories on clans, high levels of national identification, as reported in an AsiaBarometer survey conducted in 2005, indicate that citizens of Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan possess a greater proclivity to a civic identity than to any other form of subnational identification. This essay examines the relationship between state and society, in order to understand how high levels of national identification can exist in a political and social arena trapped within the traditionalism of clan politics. Although clans remain a source of identification in Central Asia, it does not take precedence over a civic identity among the citizens, as it does among the political elite. The conflicts which have occurred in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan are indicative of the rift between a state engaged in clan-based practices and a society eager to transition into a political and social arena based on the tenets of modern, democratic statehood.

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
Copyright remains with the author. The author granted permission for the file to be printed, but not for the text to be copied and pasted.
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Senior supervisor: 
N
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)
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