An analysis of the constraints and opportunities for scaling-up health human resources in the delivery of a non-pharmacological intervention for the treatment of depression in Uganda

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Keywords: 
Health Services Delivery
Mental Health - Developing Countries
Health Care Reform
Mental Illness - Developing Countries
Health Human Resources
Depression
Non-Pharmacological Interventions
Health Human Resources
Scaling-Up
Mental Health
Uganda
Abstract: 

The use of non-pharmacological interventions for the treatment of depression is evidence-based, effective and has been successfully used in many developed countries. Evidence for the usage of these types of interventions to treat depression in developing countries is not as widespread. However, two recent randomized control trials have demonstrated that a non-pharmacological intervention, specifically group interpersonal therapy (IPT), can be successful on a small-scale in Uganda to treat depression. Following a call to action by the international mental health community to act on the significant burden of depression that is afflicting the developing world, this report seeks to analyze the opportunities and constraints for scaling-up the health human resources needed to deliver this evidence-based intervention on a larger scale. This analysis was conducted by examining a previously published framework for scaling-up a health intervention in a resource-poor setting.

Description: 

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Language: 
English
Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
Copyright remains with the author
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Craig Janes
Department: 
Faculty of Health Sciences - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.Sc.)
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