One fish, two fish, old fish, new fish: Investigating differential distribution of salmon resources in the Pacific Northwest through ancient DNA analysis

Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

DNA analysis was applied to approximately 60 ancient salmon remains (1200BP) from the archaeological site of Keatley Creek in British Columbia to examine the distribution of Pacific salmon species between housepits. The success rate of DNA extraction was over 90%, yielding three species of Pacific salmon: Chinook, Sockeye and Coho. Accurate salmon species identification using mitochondria1 DNA refined theories of economic stratification and differential access to salmon resources at Keatley Creek. Additionally, the unique information made available by ancient DNA analysis offered insight into prehistoric salmon ecology and spawning behaviour in the region.

Description: 
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Language: 
English
Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
Copyright remains with the author
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of Archaeology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)
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