Off-street commercial sex : an exploratory study

Date created: 
2007
Keywords: 
Prostitution
Research
Law & legislation
Canada
Prostitutes
Conditions
Sex work
Violence
Victimization
Off-street
Decriminalization
Abstract: 

This thesis explores women’s experiences working in off-street prostitution venues in Vancouver, BC. The victimization experienced by street-based sex workers has led many people to conclude that prostitution is inherently dangerous. However, street-based workers form the minority of sex workers in Canada. The question remains, can their experiences be generalized to other types of prostitution? Consequently, this thesis examines whether female off-street sex workers face the same degree of victimization as female street-based sex workers, and asks if the experience of prostitution always entails violence. The research contained two components: a) a victimization survey examining interpersonal violence and other forms of victimization of off-street sex workers (n=39); and b) in-depth interviews with ten off-street sex workers exploring their working conditions, safety, stereotypes of prostitution, and law reform (n=10). While violence and exploitation do occur in the off-street industry, this study indicates that some women sell sex without experiencing any violence.

Description: 
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Language: 
English
Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
Copyright remains with the author
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J
Department: 
School of Criminology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)
Statistics: