Climate change, air quality and chronic disease: Prospects for adaptation through urban design - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Faculty/Staff
Date created: 
2011-05
Keywords: 
Aged
Aging
British Columbia
Canada
Chronic disease
Climate change
Demographics
Demography
Friesen2011
Friesen Conference
Gerontology
Gerontology Research Centre
Global warming
Health
Public health
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the four presentations of Panel Session 4, “Preparing Aging Populations for Climate Change in British Columbia and Beyond” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Michael Brauer "Climate change, air quality and chronic disease: Prospects for adaptation through urban design" - Climate change and air pollution are linked through common emission sources and health impacts. Warming is linked to increased forest fires, smoke emissions and resultant respiratory disease impacts. Warmer climates have already led to longer pollen seasons, worsening symptoms for those with pre-existing allergic diseases. Increases in the frequency and intensity of extreme heat events are also expected to coincide with increased summer smog episodes and their resulting cardiovascular and respiratory health impacts, including premature mortality. Health impacts of climate change via air pollution will require increased application of traditional health protection measures, while common emissions sources require that climate mitigation approaches do not compromise air quality. However, these interactions also suggest opportunities for co-benefits through which greenhouse gas emissions are reduced in combination with reductions in emissions of health-damaging air pollutants.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Description: 

approx. 90 min. for entire Panel Session. Video displays using QuickTime (PLEASE NOTE: There is an approx. 30 second delay for the video to begin)

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Video
Rights: 
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