Communicating Scientific Uncertainty About COVID-19 — with Alice Fleerackers

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Faculty/Staff
Date created: 
2021-03-16
Identifier: 
btrp110
Keywords: 
Below the Radar
Alice Fleerackers
Community Engagement
Communications
btrp
Vancity Office of Community Engagement
Knowledge Mobilization
Health Sciences
Coronavirus
Scholarly Publishing
Media Studies
Abstract: 

Alice Fleerackers is a freelance writer, a researcher at the ScholCommLab, the Communications Officer at Art the Science, and a Science in Society Editor at Science Borealis. As a doctoral student at Simon Fraser University, she is working under the supervision of Dr. Juan Pablo Alperin to explore how controversial science is communicated in the digital sphere.

With degrees in psychology and publishing, Alice is passionate about bringing research into everyday life. As a professional communicator and researcher, she’s had the pleasure of interviewing psychologists, scientists, and many others on everything from the psychology of cat video addiction to the science behind astrological belief. She’s also worked as a magazine editor, a newspaper writer, and a book publicist, and has contributed to outlets such as the Globe and Mail,Nautilus, and more.

Description: 

With the onset of the pandemic came a pressing need to bring health science information to the public, and fast. SFU researcher Alice Fleerackers joins Below the Radar to discuss the uptake of pre-print, or un-peer reviewed research by news media in the age of COVID-19. She speaks to host Melissa Roach about a recent study she has co-authored that analyzes how media communicate uncertainty in COVID-19 research.


Alice is a freelance writer and researcher specializing in online science communication. Currently, she is a researcher at ScholCommLab, the Research Officer at Art the Science, and a Science in Society Editor at Science Borealis. She is also a PhD student at SFU, where she is exploring how uncertain health science is communicated online.


In this episode, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of reporting on unpublished health research; issues of public trust in journalism and science; and how researchers, communicators, and consumers of health science media can each navigate these complexities, even as the ground shifts beneath our feet.



Resources:

STUDY: “Communicating Scientific Uncertainty in an Age of COVID-19: An Investigation into the Use of Preprints by Digital Media Outlets” - Health Communication: https://www.scholcommlab.ca/wp-content/plugins/zotpress/lib/request/request.dl.php?api_user_id=1298012&dlkey=Q2PLARSL&content_type=application/pdf
Scholarly Communications Lab: http://scholcommlab.ca/
ASAPbio Preprints FAQ page: https://asapbio.org/preprint-info/preprint-faq
#PreprintsInThePublicEye event [Video]: https://youtu.be/tTXFwYzLPwc
“Problems with Preprints: Covering Rough-Draft Manuscripts Responsibly” - The Open Notebook: https://www.theopennotebook.com/2020/06/01/problems-with-preprints-covering-rough-draft-manuscripts-responsibly/

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Audio
Rights: 
Rights remain with the authors.
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