Super learner implementation in corrosion rate prediction

Author: 
Date created: 
2021-02-22
Identifier: 
etd21270
Keywords: 
Corrosion rate
Super learner
Selection framework
Performance evaluation metrics
Adaptive corrosion protection system
Abstract: 

This thesis proposes a new machine learning model for predicting the corrosion rate of 3C steel in seawater. The corrosion rate of a material depends not just on the nature of the material but also on the material's environmental conditions. The proposed machine learning model comes with a selection framework based on the hyperparameter optimization method and a performance evaluation metric to determine the models that qualify for further implementation in the proposed models’ ensembles architecture. The major aim of the selection framework is to select the least number of models that will fit efficiently (while already hyperparameter-optimized) into the architecture of the proposed model. Subsequently, the proposed predictive model is fitted on some portion of a dataset generated from an experiment on corrosion rate in five different seawater conditions. The remaining portion of this dataset is implemented in estimating the corrosion rate. Furthermore, the performance of the proposed models’ predictions was evaluated using three major performance evaluation metrics. These metrics were also used to evaluate the performance of two hyperparameter-optimized models (Smart Firefly Algorithm and Least Squares Support Vector Regression (SFA-LSSVR) and Support Vector Regression integrating Leave Out One Cross-Validation (SVR-LOOCV)) to facilitate their comparison with the proposed predictive model and its constituent models. The test results show that the proposed model performs slightly below the SFA-LSSVR model and above the SVR-LOOCV model by an RMSE score difference of 0.305 and RMSE score of 0.792. Despite its poor performance against the SFA-LSSVR model, the super learner model outperforms both hyperparameter-optimized models in the utilization of memory and computation time (graphically presented in this thesis).

Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
This thesis may be printed or downloaded for non-commercial research and scholarly purposes. Copyright remains with the author.
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Bonnie Gray
Department: 
Applied Sciences: School of Engineering Science
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.Sc.
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