One Hundred More — with Justine A. Chambers and Laurie Young (video)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Faculty/Staff
Date created: 
2020-10-01
Keywords: 
SFU
SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement
Below the Radar
podcast
knowledge mobilization
knowledge sharing
knowledge democracy
arts
culture
resistance
dance
dance artists
choreographers
everyday choreographies
embodiment
collaborative creation
social choreographies
political
structured improvisation
radical care
Abstract: 

Justine A. Chambers and Laurie Young see choreography in everything. Both are deeply interested in the daily movements that make up the choreographies of our lives, and in capacity to use dance as a political tool. As two dance artists, mothers, and women of colour, the two came together across continents to co-create One hundred more, a dance performance portraying the gestures of resistance. Through structured improvisation and moving together, the piece explores the politics of movement and the many ways of embodying the refusal to submit. In this episode, Justine and Laurie are in conversation with Am Johal about their shared work, the radical centering of care and wellness in their collaborations, as well as the social choreographies and relational choreographies that can be found in the everyday.

Justine A. Chambers is a dance artist living and working on the unceded Coast Salish territories of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. Her movement based practice considers how choreography can be an empathic practice rooted in collaborative creation, close observation, and the body as a site of a cumulative embodied archive. Privileging what is felt over what is seen, she works with dances that are already there – the social choreographies present in the everyday. She is Max Tyler-Hite’s mother.

Laurie Young is a Berlin based Canadian dance artist who focuses on the embodiment of unauthorized histories and their representation and how relationships are choreographed between human and other than human beings in the theater, museum and city.  Along with her own choreographies, Laurie has been busy with transdisciplinary projects between arts and science and is a triple fellow of Volkswagen Foundations Arts and Science and Motion. Her work has been presented at the Sophiensaele, Naturkundemuseum Berlin, The Australian Museum, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Martin Gropius Bau amongst others. She is currently a recipient of the Tanzpraxis scholarship of the Senatverwaltung für Kultur und Europa 2020/2021.

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Video
Rights: 
Rights remain with the authors.
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