Understanding how to translate from children’s tangible learning apps to mobile Augmented Reality through technical development research

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-12-17
Identifier: 
etd20655
Keywords: 
Augmented reality
Tangible user interfaces
Digital tabletops
Collaborative learning
Language learning. technical development research.
Abstract: 

In this thesis, I discuss the design and development of two Augmented Reality (AR) applications derived from two tangible systems. In this technology development research, I explore if it is feasible to port tangible systems to mobile (tablet-based) AR systems so that these systems can be more widely deployed as research prototypes and eventually as products. I use two existing tangible systems (Youtopia, PhonoBlocks), which have been validated empirically, as case studies. To do this, I begin by determining the key requirements that each AR system must have – those known through theoretical design guidance or shown in previous studies to be important for the effectiveness of the tangible system. I designed and implemented design and technical AR solutions for each requirement. For some features, I explore possible solutions and provide a rationale for the selection of a solution. For other features, I present one solution that is feasible. In this way, I explore feature by feature if it is feasible to create AR applications that are more affordable and scalable than the tangible systems while keeping the core design requirements. Future work would need to include the integration of these features and creating fully functional systems. I discuss the technical and design challenges for each of the applications and possible considerations to make when making similar applications. I also contribute preliminary design guidelines for creating new tabletop AR learning applications. Overall, my result contributes to new techniques that may be used to create a tablet-based AR application, which is more affordable and scalable for technology-enabled learning research and development than tangible systems or AR through head-mounted displays.

Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
This thesis may be printed or downloaded for non-commercial research and scholarly purposes. Copyright remains with the author.
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Alissa Antle
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School of Interactive Arts and Technology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.
Statistics: