Investigating regeneration in a raised ombrotrophic bog after peat extraction

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-12
Identifier: 
etd20183
Keywords: 
Atkins-Durbrow Hydropeat method
Burns Bog
Ditch blocking
Ecological restoration
Peat extraction
Raised ombrotrophic bog
Abstract: 

Burns Bog is a raised ombrotrophic bog in Delta, British Columbia and faced with myriad disturbances. This study is focused on the impact and restoration of peat extraction by the Atkins-Durbrow Hydropeat method. Depth to water table, relative abundance and distribution of vegetation, and the degree of peat decomposition at consistent-depth intervals were investigated to elucidate the status of passive and active ecological restoration in three fields previously harvested for peat approximately one decade apart and compared to a fourth unharvested field. Summary statistics, Redundancy Analysis, and regression were used to compare restoration status and trends in hydrology, vegetation composition, and peat accumulation. A lag period between cessation of harvest and implementation of restoration, coupled with rapid anthropogenic climate change, serve as impediments to restoration here. Intervention in the form of improved rainfall retention, assisted recolonization, and the introduction of nurse species are recommended to improve bog function and resiliency.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Rights: 
This thesis may be printed or downloaded for non-commercial research and scholarly purposes. Copyright remains with the author.
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Ken Ashley
Department: 
Environment: Ecological Restoration
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Sc.
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