Regular Dimpled Nickel Surfaces for Improved Efficiency of the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Faculty/Staff
Final version published as: 

"Regular Dimpled Nickel Surfaces for Improved Efficiency of the Oxygen Evolution Reaction," Taylor, A.K.; Andreu, I.; Gates, B.D., ACS Applied Energy Materials, 2018, 1 (4), 1771-1782.  https://doi.org/10.1021/acsaem.8b00338

 

Date created: 
2018-04-02
Identifier: 
DOI: 10.1021/acsaem.8b00338
Keywords: 
Nickel
Oxygen evolution reaction
Self-assembly
Alkaline electrolysis
Textured surfaces
Efficiency
Wettability
Dimpled
Abstract: 

Persistent bubble accumulation during the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) can effectively block catalytically active surface sites and reduce overall system performance. The OER is an essential half-reaction with relevance to metal–air batteries, fuel cells, and water electrolysis for power to gas applications. The renewable energy sector could benefit from the identification of surface morphologies that can effectively reduce the accumulation of bubbles on electrocatalytic surfaces. In this work, regular dimpled nickel (Ni) features were prepared to investigate how electrode morphology and therefore its roughness and wetting properties may affect the efficiency of the OER. The dimpled Ni features were prepared using spherical poly(styrene) (PS) templates with a diameter of 1 μm. The electrodeposition against regular, self-assembled arrays of PS templates was tuned to produce four types of dimpled features each with a different depth. Enhancements to the OER efficiency were observed for some types of dimpled Ni features when compared to a planar electrodeposited Ni electrode, while the dimpled features that were the most recessed demonstrated reduced efficiencies for the OER. The findings from this study emphasize the influences of electrode surface morphology on processes involving electrocatalytic gas evolution.

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Article
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Rights remain with the authors.
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Sponsor(s): 
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)
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