Measurement Instruments for Quantifying Physical Resilience in Aging: A Scoping Review Protocol

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Graduate student (PhD)
Final version published as: 

Peters, Sue & Cosco, Theodore & Mackey, Dawn & S. Sarohia, Gurkaran & Leong, Jeffrey & Wister, Andrew. (2019). Measurement instruments for quantifying physical resilience in aging: a scoping review protocol. Systematic Reviews. 8. DOI: 10.1186/s13643-019-0950-7

Date created: 
2019-01-14
Keywords: 
Resilience
Scoping review
Senior
Function
Mobility
Physical
Abstract: 

Background:  Physical resilience is the ability to optimize or recover motor function in the face of disease, injury, or aging-related decline. Greater knowledge of how some individuals regain or maintain function despite pathology may help identify protective factors and approaches that promote healthy aging. To date, a scoping review on physical resilience has not been conducted. The aims are to (1) identify measurement instruments for physical resilience, (2) synthesize and map the key concepts of physical resilience, and (3) identify gaps and make recommendations for future research.

Methods:  A scoping review of Scopus, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline Ovid, PsycINFO, and AgeLine databases will take place using the search strategy “resilience” AND (aging OR elderly OR older adult). The initial electronic search will be supplemented by hand searching the reference lists and review articles to identify any missing studies. Two parallel independent assessments of study eligibility will be conducted for the title, abstract, and full-text screens. To meet study inclusion criteria, the term “resilience” must be applied in relation to the physical health of older adults. Any disagreement will be resolved by consensus and a third reviewer consulted to make a decision if consensus is not achieved initially. Physical resilience information to be extracted are measurement instruments that describe the core domains of (1) body function or structure (signs or symptoms, etc.), (2) activity and participation (quality of life, etc.), and (3) societal impact. Tables and/or charts will map the data with distribution of studies by core domains. Finally, the amalgamation of results will be an iterative process whereby reviewers will refine the plan for presenting results after data extraction is completed so that all of the contents of the extraction may be included in the results.

Discussion:  The information gleaned in this scoping review will be essential to understand how physical resilience is currently measured and identify gaps for further research.

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Article
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