Who Are The ‘Super-Users’ Of Public Bike Share? An Analysis of Public Bike Share Members in Vancouver, BC

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Faculty/Staff
Final version published as: 

Winters, M., Hosford, K., & Javaheric, S. (2019, July 05). Who are the 'super-users' of public bike share? An analysis of public bike share members in Vancouver, BC. DOI: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2019.100946

Date created: 
2016-07-05
Keywords: 
Bicycling
Bicycle share
Active travel
Abstract: 

Public bike share programs have been critiqued for serving those who already bicycle, or more well-off individuals who already have a multitude of transportation options. While substantial research focuses on characteristics of public bike share members, it often overlooks their intensity of use which may relate more directly to transport and health gains. In this study we link system data with member survey data to characterize “super-users” of Vancouver's public bike share system. We used system data from September 1, 2016–August 31, 2017 to calculate member-specific trip rates (trips/month). We linked system data to demographic and travel data for members who completed an online survey in 2017 (1232 members who had made 89,945 trips). We defined super-users as those who made 20 or more trips/month. We used a logistic regression to model demographic and travel characteristics associated with super-users as compared to regular users. Of the 1232 members, 204 were super-users. Super-users made 47% of the trips and had a median trip rate of 29.3 trips/month. In adjusted models, super-users were more likely to be young, male, have household incomes below $75,000, and live and work near bike share docking stations. Super-users had fewer transportation options than regular users, with lower odds of having a personal bike or car share membership. Amongst members, we found a distinct demographic profile for super-users relative to regular users, suggesting that usage is an important consideration when quantifying transport and health gains, and the resulting equity implications of public bike share programs.

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Article
Rights: 
Rights remain with the authors.
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