Evaluation of the Impact of a Public Bicycle Share Program on Population Bicycling in Vancouver, BC

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Graduate student (Masters)
Final version published as: 

Hosford, K., Fuller, D., Lear, S. A., Teschke, K., Gauvin, L., Brauer, M., & Winters, M. (2018). Evaluation of the impact of a public bicycle share program on population bicycling in Vancouver, BC. Preventive medicine reports, 12, 176-181. doi:10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.09.014

Date created: 
2018-10-03
Keywords: 
Bicycling
Bicycle share
Built environment
Active travel
Evaluation
Abstract: 

Public bicycle share programs have been implemented in cities around the world to encourage bicycling. However, there are limited evaluations of the impact of these programs on bicycling at the population level. This study examined the impact of a public bicycle share program on bicycling amongst residents of Vancouver, BC. Using an online panel, we surveyed a population-based sample of Vancouver residents three times: prior to the implementation of the public bicycle share program (T0, October 2015, n=1111); in the early phase of implementation (T1, October 2016, n=995); and one-year post implementation (T2, October 2017, n=966). We used difference in differences estimation to assess whether there was an increase in bicycling amongst those living and/or working in close proximity (≤500 m) to Vancouver's Mobi by Shaw Go public bicycle share program, compared to those living and working outside this area. Results suggest that only living or only working inside the bicycle share service area was not associated with increases in bicycling at T1 or T2 relative to those outside the service area. Both living and working inside the bicycle share service area was associated with increases in bicycling at T1 (OR: 2.26, 95% CI: 1.07, 4.80), however not at T2 (OR: 1.37, 95% CI: 0.67, 2.83). These findings indicate that the implementation of a public bicycle share program may have a greater effect on bicycling for residents who both live and work within the service area, although this effect may not be sustained over time. 

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 
Sponsor(s): 
City of Vancouver (Canada)
Canadian Institutes for Health Research (Canada)
Statistics: