Why Do Some Patents Get Licensed While Others Do Not

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Faculty/Staff
Final version published as: 

Ruckman, Karen and McCarthy, Ian.  Why Do Some Patents Get Licensed While Others Do Not? Industrial and Corporate Change. 2017. v. 26 n.4, 667-688. DOI: 10.1093/icc/dtw046

 

Date created: 
2016-11
Keywords: 
Licensing
Patents
Licensors
Licensees
Biotechnology
Innovation
Technology commercialization
Topic modelling
Abstract: 

To understand why some patents get licensed and others do not, we estimate a portfolio of firm- and patent-level determinants for why a particular licensor’s patent was licensed over all technologically similar patents held by other licensors. Using data for licensed biopharmaceutical patents, we build a set of alternate patents that could have been licensed-in using topic modeling techniques. This provides a more sophisticated way of controlling for patent characteristics and analyzing the attractiveness of a licensor and the characteristics of the patent itself. We find that patents owned by licensors with technological prestige, experience at licensing, and combined technological depth and breadth have a greater chance at being chosen by licensees. This suggests that a licensor’s standing and organizational learning rather than the quality of its patent alone influence the success of outward licensing.

Description: 

The fulltext of this paper will appear in Summit in December 2018 in keeping with the 24 month embargo period of the journal Industrial and Corporate Change and Oxford University Press. If you require access to the fulltext prior to December 2018 please contact summit@sfu.ca

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Article
Rights: 
Rights remain with the authors.
Statistics: