Full Spectrum Archaeology

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Faculty/Staff
Final version published as: 

Hogg, Erin A, John R. Welch, and Neal Ferris (2017) Full Spectrum Archaeology. Archaeologies 13(1): 175–200. 

https://doi.org/10.1007/s11759-017-9315-9

Date created: 
2017-04-09
Identifier: 
DOI: 10.1007/s11759-017-9315-9
Keywords: 
Archaeological resource management
Cultural heritage management
History of archaeology
International heritage policies
Abstract: 

Full Spectrum Archaeology (FSA) is an aspiration stemming from the convergence of archaeology’s fundamental principles with international heritage policies and community preferences. FSA encompasses study and stewardship of the full range of heritage resources in accord with the full range of associated values and through the application of treatments selected from the full range of appropriate options. Late modern states, including British Columbia, Canada, nominally embrace de jure heritage policies consonant with international standards yet also resist de facto heritage management practice grounded in professional ethics and local values and preferences. In response, inheritor communities and their allies in archaeology are demonstrating the benefits of FSA and reclaiming control over cultural heritage. Archaeology and heritage management driven by altruistic articulation of communal, educational, scientific and other values further expose shortcomings and vulnerabilities of late modern states as well as public goods in and from FSA.

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Article
Rights: 
Rights remain with the authors
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