Parental Support for Students Who Participate in High School Athletics: An Exploration of the Perceived Influence of Parents and Its Effect on Student Self-Efficacy and Academic Success

Date created: 
2017-04-10
Identifier: 
etd10055
Keywords: 
High School Athletics
Parents
Academic success
Self efficacy
Perception
Involvement
Abstract: 

This mixed method study explored student athletes’ perception of parental influence in their high school athletic endeavours and how this perceived influence affected their self efficacy and academic success.   The quantitative data was derived from surveys that gauged student perceived parental involvement, self efficacy and academic success in two high schools in a large metropolitan school district in British Columbia. One of the schools was a school composed primarily of students of mid to high social economic status while the other was designated an inner-city school.  The qualitative focus group consisted 10 athletes from each of the schools – a male and female from each grade – discussing students’ feelings about perceived parental involvement and how it affected their self-efficacy and academic success.  The findings showed that all of the student athletes – regardless of which school they attended – perceived that their parents were involved in their high school athletic careers. This perceived parental influence did not, however, substantially influence their self-efficacy or academic success.  Student athletes did feel increased membership when part of a high school athletic team and the interactions with their peer group and positive role models is linked to engagement in school, stronger feelings of self-worth, and academic success.  This study showed that perceived parental influence, while likely a positive support for students, had very little effect on the students’ perception about themselves or their academic success.

Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
This thesis may be printed or downloaded for non-commercial research and scholarly purposes. Copyright remains with the author.
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Dr. Daniel Laitsch
Dr. Fred Renihan (retired)
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ed.D.
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