Racialized migrant women: Experiences of community organizers

Date created: 
2017-03-22
Identifier: 
etd10025
Keywords: 
Critical race theory
Racialized migrant women
Settler – migrant relationships
Solidarity with indigenous peoples
Participatory approaches
Abstract: 

This research explores the experiences and identities of self-identified racialized migrant women working in community advocacy sectors. Using feminist critical race theories and approaches, I conducted three community conversations and three interviews where participants explored an array of topics including Indigeniety, self-care, sexism, homophobia and settler – migrant relationships. This research includes two themes: 1) the implication of migrant bodies in the systemic dispossession of Indigenous Nations by exploring the ways in which we (as migrants working in advocacy sectors) contribute to the solidification of colonial and neo-colonial narratives; and 2) offers a model of participatory feminist methods and approaches described in this work as a means to provide alternative ways of engaging migrant communities in research.

Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
This thesis may be printed or downloaded for non-commercial research and scholarly purposes. Copyright remains with the author.
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Jennifer Marchbank
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.
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