Cross-cultural Generalizability of Psychopathic Personality Disorder: Differences Between Individualistic Versus Collectivistic Cultures

Author: 
Date created: 
2016-04-04
Identifier: 
etd9483
Keywords: 
Psychopathy
CAPP
Cross-culture
Individualism-Collectivism
Measurement Equivalence
Means and Covariance Structure Analysis
Abstract: 

Research on Psychopathic Personality Disorder (PPD) has hitherto focused predominantly on White North Americans. The extent to which the current conceptualization of PPD can be extrapolated to other cultures remains a question. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the generalizability of the construct of PPD, as defined using the Comprehensive Assessment of Psychopathic Personality (CAPP; see Cooke, Hart, Logan, & Michie, 2013), across individualistic versus collectivistic (IND-COL) cultures. Specifically, the measurement equivalence of CAPP self-ratings across IND-COL cultures was examined using Means and Covariance Structure (MACS) analysis in a sample of 775 undergraduates. IND-COL was measured four ways at three levels: the individual cultural orientation level, the perceived cultural context, and the syndromal levels of nationality and ethnicity. Results showed general configural invariance for a 3-factor solution for the CAPP, indicating the construct of PPD was conceptually similar across IND-COL groups. There was, however, some indication of a lack of metric and scalar invariance, depending on how IND-COL was operationalized. Implications for understanding the pan-cultural core of PPD and future cross-cultural research on PPD are discussed.

Document type: 
Thesis
Rights: 
This thesis may be printed or downloaded for non-commercial research and scholarly purposes. Copyright remains with the author.
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Stephen Hart
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.
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