A Cost-Benefit/Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Of Proposed Supervised Injection Facilities In Montreal, Canada

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Faculty/Staff
Final version published as: 

Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy 2013, 8:25 doi:10.1186/1747-597X-8-25

Date created: 
2013
Keywords: 
Supervised injection facility
Harm reduction
Cost-benefit
Cost-effectiveness
Abstract: 

Background

This paper will determine whether expanding Insite (North America’s first and only supervised injection facility) to more locations in Canada such as Montreal, cost less than the health care consequences of not having such expanded programs for injection drug users.

Methods

By analyzing secondary data gathered in 2012, this paper relies on mathematical models to estimate the number of new HIV and Hepatitis C (HCV) infections prevented as a result of additional SIF locations in Montreal.

Results

With very conservative estimates, it is predicted that the addition of each supervised injection facility (up-to a maximum of three) in Montreal will on average prevent 11 cases of HIV and 65 cases of HCV each year. As a result, there is a net cost saving of CDN$0.686 million (HIV) and CDN$0.8 million (HCV) for each additional supervised injection site each year. This translates into a net average benefit-cost ratio of 1.21: 1 for both HIV and HCV.

Conclusions

Funding supervised injection facilities in Montreal appears to be an efficient and effective use of financial resources in the public health domain.

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Article
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