“We Are Not Being Heard”: Aboriginal Perspectives on Traditional Foods Access and Food Security

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Faculty/Staff
Final version published as: 

Journal of Environmental and Public Health
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 130945, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/130945

Date created: 
2012
Keywords: 
Aboriginal
Food security
Abstract: 

Aboriginal peoples are among the most food insecure groups in Canada, yet their perspectives and knowledge are often sidelined in mainstream food security debates. In order to create food security for all, Aboriginal perspectives must be included in food security research and discourse. This project demonstrates a process in which Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal partners engaged in a culturally appropriate and respectful collaboration, assessing the challenges and barriers to traditional foods access in the urban environment of Vancouver, BC, Canada. The findings highlight local, national, and international actions required to increase access to traditional foods as a means of achieving food security for all people. The paper underscores the interconnectedness of local and global food security issues and highlights challenges as well as solutions with potential to improve food security of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples alike.

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Article
Rights: 
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