Policies to promote socialization and welfare in dog breeding

Author: 
Date created: 
2013-01-16
Identifier: 
etd7652
Keywords: 
Dogs
Breeding
Animal welfare
Canada
Public policy
Regulation
Abstract: 

Dog breeding is an unregulated industry in British Columbia and most of Canada, resulting in poor outcomes in some dogs’ welfare: genetic make-up, physical health, and mental health. This suffering in dogs results in subsequent costs to taxpayers and dog guardians. This study explores the question: How can British Columbia overcome the negative externalities surrounding the welfare and socialization of dogs in the dog- breeding industry? Policies in five countries are reviewed, informed by legislation, publicly available data, and confidential interviews with key informants. Three policy options emerge from the findings: regulation, regulation with licensing and permissible inspection, or regulation, licensing, and mandatory inspection. Approaches are evaluated using a multi-criteria approach. The study recommends a comprehensive, measurable, and equitable regulation with licensing and permissible inspection. To be effective, this regulation should be implemented with adequate consultation, training, and public education.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Rights: 
Copyright remains with the author. The author granted permission for the file to be printed and for the text to be copied and pasted.
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Jon Kesselman
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.
Statistics: